Tagged With breath of the wild

For the past 31 years, the setting of the Legend of Zelda games has mostly stayed the same -- until now. The latest game in the series, Breath of the Wild, has transformed the traditional kingdom of Hyrule into something fundamentally different to its predecessors: a world which, now more than ever, is there to be lost in.

"I'm getting stressed," I told my coworker Alex Cranz after a week with The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, "because I might never run out of crap to do in this game." The Switch launch title's map is huge, with shrines and monsters and side-quests in every direction. Areas that look out-of-bounds turn out to be ancient mazes or survivalist island challenges. For a casual gamer like myself, it's daunting at times -- which is where a guide comes in handy.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

The Switch has been having a rough launch so far, with claims of bad connectivity, scratched screens, dead pixels and miserable frame rates. Today's freakout involves the Nintendo store no longer offering the much-maligned dock for sale, with claims it's evidence of a recall or redesign -- but the theory might not hold much water.

Breath of the Wild, the 19th game in the Zelda franchise, has been universally praised for its massive (and, sorry, breathtaking) open-world environments, and for injecting life back into a 30-year-old franchise. But something else sets the Nintendo Switch's moonshot launch title apart from previous installations: The Hero of Time has a goddamn iPhone.