Tagged With biology

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By using an artificially intelligent algorithm to predict patient mortality, a research team from Stanford University is hoping to improve the timing of end-of-life care for critically ill patients. In tests, the system proved eerily accurate, correctly predicting mortality outcomes in 90 per cent of cases. But while the system is able to predict when a patient might die, it still cannot tell doctors how it came to its conclusion.

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Humans tend to rely on crafted tools in order to harm one another, but most other species have evolved weapons right on their bodies. Normally, these bashers, spikes, and other instruments of attack appear on heads or limbs. But only rarely do they end up on tails - and scientists want to know why.

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A strange animal mystery captivated the internet back in 2015: 200,000 critically endangered saiga antelopes in Kazakhstan died from internal bleeding after infections. Surreal photographs showed hundreds of dead antelopes that appeared to have simply dropped dead where they stood as a herd. Some researchers now have an update on that story.

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Your poop is a living forest. Seriously! Hundreds of species of microbes thrive inside of you, helping you to live your best life. Everyone's microbiome differs - yours from your neighbours', and different populations' from one another's. But there is much scientists still don't know about the human microbiome. And one team of scientists think they have made a leap in helping us understand this forest.

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If you've seen BBC's Planet Earth, you may recall of one of its sillier scenes: the bird-of-paradise mating dance. A female hops up to a male, who unveils a mane of feathers and puts on a performance like a drunk rendition of "Bohemian Rhapsody" at a karaoke bar. But when the male bird faces the camera, things go black - way black. Skip to 2:34 in the video below. This bird's feathers are so black that you can't see any of its facial features, just radiant blues on a sea of natural Vantablack. 

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Stool transplants are exactly what they sound like: moving poop from a healthy person into a sick person, perhaps via a pill or an enema. I bring this up because most people cringe at the idea - but they're a treatment proven effective for some antibiotic-resistant infections caused by the Clostridium difficile, or C. diff bacteria, which kill tens of thousands of people per year. A common sweetener may be worsening these C. diff infections.

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Each year, over a million Gulf corvina swim to their spawning grounds along the Colorado River Delta. These fish are famous for their loud, chattering sounds, and when corvina gather together in massive conglomerations, the noise they produce is deafening. Literally. New research shows that the sounds produced by these fish when spawning are the loudest ever recorded for a single fish -- an extraordinary display of nature that's now being turned against the species.

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Our planet popped into existence some 4.5 billion years ago. Life didn't waste time, emerging shortly thereafter - but the exact timing of this momentous event is still unknown. A study published today offers new clues into this enduring scientific mystery by claiming to have discovered Earth's oldest fossils in 3.5 billion-year-old Australian rock. Sounds like an important result, but other scientists are disputing the claim.

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Wildlife photographer Tibor Kércz would spend a few nights each year camped out in a tent near a tree, hoping to capture photos of little owls and their nestlings. But just before nightfall on one fateful evening, three of the birds flew out onto a short branch. They landed and tried stabilizing themselves... but the owlet on the end began to fall.