Tagged With bikes

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First revealed way back in 2011, Bridgestone's airless tyres use a series of rigid plastic resin spokes to help a wheel keep its shape as it rolls, instead of an inflatable inner tube that can puncture and leak. Military vehicles and ATVs have been some of the first vehicles to adopt the unorthodox design, but Bridgestone will soon be making a version of its airless tyres for use on bicycles.

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It's been about a year since I last jammed my finger putting together IKEA furniture. It was for my brand new apartment, and even though I broke a sweat and a little skin at the top of my hand, I saved a ton of money - that's the benefit of outfitting your home in IKEA housewares. Now, your favourite Swedish furniture brand is selling the same agonizing experience in a bicycle made for everyone.

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For the past three months, I've been riding the Priority Bicycles Continuum, a commuter bike outfitted with a handful of low-maintenance components and a drivetrain system with an "infinite" number of gears. It's been an absolute joy to ride and has regularly shaved about 15 minutes off my hour-long trips around Brooklyn and Manhattan. Besides being low maintenance mechanical wonder this thing moves seriously fast.

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Video: Danny MacAskill does things on a mountain bike that even physicists, who know more about the laws of the universe than anyone, would probably assume is impossible. The Scottish country side serves as the gorgeous backdrop for this video of Danny just being amazing on two wheels. But you probably won't even notice the scenery.

2

You can probably think of countless reasons why you don't want to take your dog for a walk. It's too cold, you're tired, your arch nemesis lives around the corner -- the list goes on and on. But with this double-duty exercise bike and treadmill, you can give your pup a good run without ever stepping outside.

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Video: Just because this Huffy Carnage is sold by Walmart as a mountain bike doesn't necessarily mean it can handle a legit downhill mountain run, as Phil Kmetz discovered after spending $US180 ($241) on one. Halfway through his ride the bike's brake pads were almost completely gone, and after the first jump its handlebars broke and bent.

4

About ten minutes after the very first car alarm went off, the tech went from being a genuine theft deterrent to an annoyance that everyone just ignores. The makers of the Bike Mine have a better idea, at least when it comes to getting people to notice when a bike or motorcycle is being stolen: old-fashioned explosives.