Tagged With beta decay

You probably know that atoms contain neutrons. But there's a strange, long-standing discrepancy plaguing one of the neutron's most basic measurements - something that a pair of scientists think might have to do with dark matter, the mysterious substance that supposedly accounts more than five times the amount of mass in the universe as regular matter does. The trouble is, we have no way of detecting dark matter directly, though we can see its gravitational effects on distant stars.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

You probably know that atoms contain neutrons. But there's a strange, long-standing discrepancy plaguing one of the neutron's most basic measurements - something that a pair of scientists think might have to do with dark matter, the mysterious substance that supposedly accounts more than five times the amount of mass in the universe as regular matter does. The trouble is, we have no way of detecting dark matter directly, though we can see its gravitational effects on distant stars.