Tagged With auschwitz birkenau

In 1944, Marcel Nadjari -- a Greek Jew who was forced to remove bodies from the Auschwitz gas chambers -- buried a letter in a forest near the camp. The text was rediscovered in 1980, but it was virtually unreadable. Using a new imaging technique, scientists have finally reconstructed the letter, and it's providing harrowing new details of the Holocaust -- and what it was like to work as a forced labourer in a Nazi extermination camp.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

In 1944, Marcel Nadjari -- a Greek Jew who was forced to remove bodies from the Auschwitz gas chambers -- buried a letter in a forest near the camp. The text was rediscovered in 1980, but it was virtually unreadable. Using a new imaging technique, scientists have finally reconstructed the letter, and it's providing harrowing new details of the Holocaust -- and what it was like to work as a forced labourer in a Nazi extermination camp.