Tagged With asus

If you’re someone who can’t work, play or kill time online without your desktop PC blinding you with a spectacle of flashing LEDs, ASUS will now let your external hard drive join the desktop rave. The company’s new FX HDD drive includes its own set of LEDs, illuminating a circuit trace pattern that will sync to the glowing patterns flashing across all of your other devices.

A 2-in-1 device that uses AI for smarter charging, that can also be rotated horizontally, vertically, laid flat, and with a keyboard that automatically tracks your hands while you type. That's Project PRECOG, a new device from ASUS due to ship next year.

For years, advancements in the humble laptop touchpad have ranged from "it's almost as good as a Macbook" to choosing whether to hide the left and right buttons.

It's the bit of tech laptops take for granted, in many ways. But ASUS is having a crack at turning the touchpad into something more: namely, a second screen.

There's plenty of phones on the market, but not much in the way of specific gaming phones. Motorola has tried to target the gaming market with specific accessories, while Razer upped the ante with the release of the Razer Phone. Both of those now have a proper, beefier competitor: the ROG Phone, a phone so beefy that ASUS claims it's faster than a Samsung S9 or an iPhone X.

When Essential debuted the first-ever notched display on the PH-1, it was a bold, divisive statement about smartphone design. Then Apple put one on the iPhone X and while some people still didn't get it, the sentiment around the notch shifted from confusion to curious appreciation, or even adoration. But now, after going to Mobile World Congress and seeing pretty much every other smartphone maker adopt the notch, the feature has almost entirely lost its cool.

While better known for its various PCs and gaming products, Asus has been making smartphones for quite some time. Over the previous four generations of Zenfones, Asus had always skipped the world's largest smartphone trade show, MWC in Barcelona. The reason? According to Asus' head of global marketing Marcel Campos, " just weren't ready." But it seems things are different now, because at MWC 2018, Asus is coming hard with the new Zenphone 5.

This might look like a TV. It's a big 165cm display capable of HDR and putting out 1000 nits of brightness. It even uses a quantum dot film to achieve DCI-P3 colour gamut, which is nerd speak for really good colour reproduction that's usually only found super expensive TVs. But this display is one of three new Big Format Gaming Displays Nvidia announced at CES. This thing is meant to be a gaming monitor first, and yes, shockingly, that does make a difference.

Eero should probably look over its shoulder because a new piece of software from Asus could make it and other boutique mesh routers seem super outdated. Asus, which makes some of the best standard routers available, today announced AiMesh, a new bit of software that turns old Asus routers into points in a mesh network. That means it just got easier to blanket your home in sweet, sweet wi-fi.

Battery life is the number one concern when people think about buying a new smartphone, to the point that if a phone had nearly double the longevity of even the most expensive flagship handsets, it would be easy to overlook some of its faults. But at some point deficiencies start to drag down the novelty of having a really big battery, which is precisely the problem with the Asus ZenFone 4 Max. This thing has one of the biggest batteries you can find in a smartphone -- and it's only $US200! Yet budget components take all the fun out of it.

Every time a new platform comes out, the gadget world runs headfirst into a vicious Catch-22: How do you get people to adopt new technology when there isn't any content, and if there isn't anyone using the tech, how do you convince developers to make content for that platform? Recently, we've seen this situation unfold for VR headsets like the HTC Vive and Oculus Rift. Despite both systems' ability to evoke profound jaw-dropping reactions from those who've tried it, VR is still too expensive and thin on content for people to really care.

A couple of weeks ago I was braving the big crowds of E3 to meet with the Nvidia team, and while I was ostensibly there to check out Destiny 2 on a PC, what I really wanted to know was what the hell Max-Q Design was. Nvidia announced its new design philosophy back in May, and I'd spent the intervening weeks unable to shake the sense that this was all just a great big marketing ploy -- an acknowledgement that Nvidia's most powerful GPUs often end up in great big computing monstrosities.

Screens are great. They are a visual gateway into the primary forms of entertainment that modern society indulge in. But as they become larger and sleeker, their mobility is an issue.

That's where the ASUS P3B Projector can be your saviour. Whether you're having a movie marathon, getting out of the city or attending a meeting, they have you covered for all your projection needs.

There's some pretty crazy high-end tech on the floor of Computex in Taipei this year. Chief amongst them are two new monitors that take the absolute best tech from high-end TVs and cram it into desktop-friendly sizes, although the price tags will probably put any other peripheral you could ever think of to shame. If you're cashed up and ready to frag, the Asus ROG Swift PG35VQ and the Acer Predator X35 are equally worthy of your attention.

Shared from Kotaku

Buying a gaming monitor has always been a bit like Australian broadband. You could have really nice image quality, 4K and HDR support, a 120hz or 144hz refresh rate, plenty of real estate, but you couldn't have it all especially if you wanted it to be affordable. And even if you're prepared to spend a pretty penny, chances are you'll still have to compromise somewhere.

You couldn't have it all in a gaming monitor. Well, that used to be the case.