Tagged With astrochemistry

There's an unidentified source of infrared throughout the universe. By looking at the specific wavelengths of the light, scientists think that come from carbon - but not just any carbon, a special kind where the atoms are arranged in multiple hexagonal rings. No one has been able to spot one of these multi-ring "polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons," or PAHs in space - even though the infrared emissions imply that these PAHs should make up 10 per cent of the universe's carbon. Now, scientists have found a new hint.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

There's an unidentified source of infrared throughout the universe. By looking at the specific wavelengths of the light, scientists think that come from carbon - but not just any carbon, a special kind where the atoms are arranged in multiple hexagonal rings. No one has been able to spot one of these multi-ring "polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons," or PAHs in space - even though the infrared emissions imply that these PAHs should make up 10 per cent of the universe's carbon. Now, scientists have found a new hint.