Tagged With appliances

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Released last year, Google Assistant hasn't really proven itself useful outside of checking the weather, searching Google, or setting an alarm using voice commands. So far it's been limited to basic features that are more than matched by other smart assistants like Amazon's Alexa and Apple's Siri. But Google is trying to change that.

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Welcome back to Toy Aisle, our roundup of the most interesting toys we've seen this week. It's a Guardians of the Galaxy blowout as we have life-sized Groots, creepy plush Groots and a fancy cassette player. But wait, there's more — including a very swanky David Bowie figure and a very large Iron Man. Check it out!

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Video: After you watch this video of an adorable little girl named Rayna greeting and hugging a new robot friend, you'll come to the realisation it will never hug or love her back — because it's actually a discarded water heater. (Sad!) Shortly after that, you'll also come to the realisation that kids clearly aren't being raised with a proper fear and respect of robots.

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The makers of the FoldiMate realise that the worst part of doing laundry is having to fold all your clothes once they come out of the washer and dryer. A third machine that does all that for you could revolutionise chores as we know it, but the FoldiMate might not be the answer to our lazy prayers.

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We called Dyson's cordless DC59 Motorhead the first genuine replacement for a full-sized vacuum, even with a few annoying design quirks and limited battery life. It has taken the company almost two years to design a follow-up, but the new Dyson V8 appears to fix most of the complaints we had with the original.

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There's a reason the microwave in your kitchen is a heavy brick: it uses a magnetron and vacuum tube technology that dates back to World War II. But since then, the technologies involved have been vastly improved (see mobile phone towers) and a company called Wayv in the UK is finally using them to shrink the microwaves.

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Imagine a world where pizza didn't come from the pizza store. Imagine if you could pop down into your spacious kitchen, toss some toppings on dough and throw it all into your very own internet-connected pizza oven. This future is finally possible — but it's expensive.