Tagged With apple watch

Reproductive health tech is going through some growing pains. On the one hand, there’s been a lot of progress now that menstruation—and all it entails—isn’t quite so taboo. For instance, there’s now a wearable that’s conducting clinical studies about how various factors could lead to more accurate fertile window predictions. But there’s also been some troubling developments. Recently, a popular pregnancy tracking app was found handing private data to employers, and another fertility app was found to be funded by anti-abortion groups. Yesterday at WWDC, Apple threw its hat into the ring by expanding its period tracking options via a new Cycles Tracking feature on the Apple Watch and iPhone. None of it was revolutionary per se, but there’s reason to believe that Apple might be the company that gets it right.

In the early hours of Tuesday morning here in Australia, Apple held its WWDC 2019 keynote.

Over two hours a storm of new announcements were made - from iOS 13, to the death of iTunes to a hardcore new Mac Pro that looks like a fancy cheese grater.

Here's all of our in-depth Dub Dub coverage in one handy place.

Let it be said, Apple will never forget to remind you its Apple Watch is the best selling smartwatch out there. This year’s WWDC is no exception. At today’s keynote, Apple’s Kevin Lynch took the stage to reveal all the updates we can expect to see in watchOS 6, and therefore, the Apple Watch Series 5 later this fall.

One of Apple’s biggest selling points is the general high quality of its products. But after continued problems with the butterfly keyboards on recent MacBooks followed by a new lawsuit regarding the Apple Watch< and issues with late-model iPad Pros, Apple’s reputation for making reliable premium devices is starting to feel a bit shaky.

We’re up to the fourth iteration of Apple’s wearable, and the thing still can’t natively track my sleep. The Fitbit has been doing that almost from the beginning, and Apple has looked a little silly for lacking the feature. However, Bloomberg is reporting that Apple’s finally started testing sleep tracking, and it could appear on an Apple Watch as soon as soon as 2020.

A weird thing happened this year: Apple put its brand new iPhone on sale just a few weeks after release. Well, it wasn’t an outright sale. Faced with poor sales, the company boosted trade-in values of old iPhones so that you could get an iPhone XR for up to $US300 ($426) off. These slumping sales numbers are part of a trend, too. People just aren’t buying as many iPhones as they used to, so Apple has been scrambling to figure out its future.

Of all the things you do with your iOS devices, listening to music is probably still one of the most common reasons you reach for them. The iPod isn’t dead; it just got lost in a sea of other features. But you could make it the star of the show again with this tiny case that (sort of) transforms your Apple Watch back into one of Apple’s most iconic creations.

Shared from Lifehacker

Normally, when we review products at Lifehacker, we try to follow a set format that focuses on the main things that matter; purpose, specs, what's good, what's bad and a recommendation. And while we've already reviewed the Apple Watch, I've had the chance to use it in a situation I didn't really anticipate - as a replacement for an iPhone. This is the first Apple Watch I've had with cellular comms so I decided to use it differently to previous versions.

Three years and four hardware revisions down the line, and it’s clear that the Apple Watch is here to stay—but are you squeezing all the functionality you can out of your Apple wearable? Here we present 19 tips and tricks for the Apple Watch, many of which will work across multiple models, to help you really master your wrist-based mini-computer.

Spotify's long-awaited Apple Watch app is already in the hands of beta testers, according to a Reddit post and some screenshots uploaded to Imgur today. Spotify's online forums have been bombarded with requests for Apple Watch support for years, but until today it's never seemed like the integration ever had much momentum.

There’s always a risk involved when grabbing the latest software update for a device as soon as it’s released. You want to try out all those new features, but there’s bound to be a bug or two discovered as the masses get their hands on it. That gamble didn’t pay off for some Apple Watch Series 4 users, who discovered that watchOS 5.1 bricked their fancy new wearables.

Saudi Arabia is threatening to give 5-year prison terms and heavy fines to anyone caught spreading “fake news” online, a warning to those discussing the suspected murder of Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi. The threat, published over the weekend in the Saudi Gazette, echoes one of President Trump’s favourite phrases to demean any journalism that he finds unfavorable to his regime.

Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi journalist-in-exile, frequent critic of the ruling House of Saud, and Washington Post columnist, went missing after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on October 2. Since then, Turkish government officials largely speaking under the cover of anonymity have insisted that Saudi security forces waiting in ambush inside tortured and murdered him in revenge for speaking freely about their autocratic rulers.

No matter how sceptical we were from the very beginning the Apple Watch is everywhere now. You see them on the wrists of all kinds of people—not just tech nerds. It is officially a thing. And as of the Series 3 last year, it was even a pretty good thing that you could buy without feeling annoyed to hell by shortcomings. So where does that leave us with the Apple Watch Series 4, the device’s first major design overhaul since it was launched? Well, it’s a totally good, not regrettable thing, except bigger—and with bigger ideas that push the boundaries of how we think about wearable devices.