Tagged With anya taylor-joy

Nineteen years ago, I saw M. Night Shyamalan’s Unbreakable and fell in love. To this day, it’s one of my favourite movies of all time. So, when I saw Split four months before release, the shocking revelation that it took place in the same universe was one of my most memorable theatrical experiences.

I say these things to give context to how painful these next sentences are. I’m as big a fan of the Unbreakable series as anyone I know, and Glass is a major disappointment.

There are a few reasons why Split is the perfect title for the new M. Night Shyamalan movie. The most obvious one is the fact it's about a man with multiple split personalities who kidnaps three young girls. The other is that the movie itself is split: 98 per cent of the movie is a good Shyamalan film, which is its own pleasant surprise. But the final 2 per cent is "Oh my God. OH MY GOD."

A tale of scientists creating a monster isn't quite a tale as old as time, but it is a familiar one. Director Luke Scott -- second-unit director on father Ridley's The Martian and Exodus: Gods and Kings -- uses his expertise to turn Morgan into a gorgeously shot film, but unfortunately it's one that doesn't break much new ground with its story.

Video: In 2015, M. Night Shyamalan released his best film in years, found-footage nightmare The Visit. He returns to a conventional style with Split, which may or may not delve into the supernatural, but definitely flirts with some very weird science. It also has a killer cast; James McAvoy alone gets to play 24 different characters.