Tagged With alfa romeo

Shared from Dmarge

Think back to the modern era of cars and you’ll recall that there’s not been a year without a concept car to wow the crowds. Whether it’s rolled out from a factory in Italy, England, Japan or America, concept cars have long been the testing bed for cutting-edge technology and design. It’s also this very reason that a lot of these insane concept machines never actually make it onto public roads short of spawning one or two examples.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

1,000 miles. 1,600 kilometres. 450 automobiles pre-dating 1957. Called the world’s most beautiful race by Enzo Ferrari. These are the evocative words that only one event called Mille Miglia can spruik. Not that the timeless gathering ever needed to be sold, since it’s been a global phenomenon for petrol heads ever since its inception in 1927.

This story was originally published on D’Marge.

If curves could kill then consider the Giulia Quadrifoglio (QV) one deadly Italian. It’s beautiful, it’s angular, it’s aggressive, but most importantly it doesn’t feel like a carbon copy of the other mid-sized sedans in its class. It’s unique in all the right places with little touches which give it the ‘don’t mess with me, I’ll blow your doors off’ vibe -- The very vibe you want to give off when dropping the kids off at school.

It’s probably the worst way to ever spruik driver safety, but easily the coolest in terms of endorsing new technology.

Transportation designer Olcay Tuncay has dreamt up one of the wildest Alfa Romeos to ever be rendered. The F1-inspired car works by utilising the lost energy from aerodynamic drag, that is, the wind that hits the car as it moves through the air.