Tagged With ces

The Consumer Technology Association (CTA), the organisation behind CES, doesn’t exactly have an admirable reputation when it comes to its treatment of women and products designed for women, specifically sexually-oriented ones. It appears the organisation is attempting to cover its arse when it comes to this reputation, but it is doing so in a way that is breathtakingly backward.

When MSI released the GS65 last year, it took a risk. Instead of making something massively powerful like the GT75, MSI swapped out its typical red-and-black colour scheme and focused on a thin-and-light to create a more portable, but still fast all-rounder.

And as a result, the GS65 became the company’s best selling laptop of 2018. But for 2019, MSI is leaning heavily on a refreshingly old school information source to help improve its systems: feedback from users...and feedback in the laptops themselves.

Every year, CES sets the stage for all the wild, wonderful, and boundary-pushing tech we expect to see later in the year. But sometimes, as cool as all those gadgets are, some of the most interesting things at CES are all the inane stunts, absurd observations, and oddly touching moments that happen away from the bright lights of the stage. So without further ado, I present to you the CES Meta Awards.

For all the cool gadgets that get shown off at CES, there’s also a bunch of things that make even the most jaded tech bloggers squint in a mix of confusion and amused befuddlement. Some of it you’ll find on the main show floor, others you’ll find in the nooks and corners at the Sands Expo and Eureka Park.

In the last few months of 2018 it seemed like the mobile world was dominated by the foldable arms race. Samsung was always at the forefront of the conversation, but there were other contenders who might get there first, including Huawei.

In the end, a small company called Royole beat everyone to it, releasing its foldable to the commercial Chinese market at the end of last year. It also made an appearance at CES 2019, so I pushed my way through the crowds to ensure I got my hands (and butt) on it.

There’s a lot wrong with women’s fashion, but torn stockings rank pretty high on the list of annoying quirks I’ve just learned to shut up and deal with. Seriously, anything will tear pantyhose. Is your toenail hideously long? Tear. Did you walk too close to a sharp table edge? Giant hole in your thigh. Did you simply sit down with too much gusto? Prepare for your stockings to split at your giblets. Were you lazy and decided to stick your one good pair in the washer instead of washing it by hand? Goodbye pantyhose!

Over the past few years, Ossia has impressed us with demonstrations of its over-the-air power delivery system which promises to make charging cables and pads obsolete. But it’s always been just demos of prototypes, which feels like a constant tease of a future we want right now. For CES 2019, however, Ossia has worked with accessories maker Spigen to develop the first truly wireless charging case for smartphones, and given us a more solid timeline of when the company’s wireless power tech will be available to everyone.

8K has dominated the TV announcements at CES this year. Despite there being no actual 8K content yet, everyone wants a piece of the next gen display action.

Here are all of the ones that were announced.

AMD CEO Lisa Su sat down with press, including Gizmodo, yesterday to chat about the company’s CES announcements. The conversation started with a bang, addressing Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang’s criticisms of AMD less than an hour earlier, then moved to a broad discussion of AMD’s business. Of particular note was the discussion of AMD chips in Windows laptops and future gaming products AMD might be working on.

Welp, yesterday I spent two hours listening to the CEOs of rival companies talk trash about each other. It reminded me of my parents right after their divorce. Nvidia was shit talking AMD, and AMD politely responded with just enough bite for you to take notice.