Tagged With 8k

I am not on board with 8K. The TVs will be expensive, there’s zero content for them, and they’ll heavily rely on internal processors for upscaling that already struggle to upscale HD content properly to 4K. It seems smarter to work on HDR tech, which makes a more substantial improvement at this time than higher resolution. 8K feels less like new tech to be excited about, and more like flashy language someone in marketing is hoping will help a company sell a few more TVs.

But during a closed-door briefing at CES last week, Sony attempted to make a case for why 8K should be the future of televisions, and it made some sense.

It’s hard to imagine CES without TVs, and this year that almost happened. This is not to say there weren’t any TVs in Las Vegas. There were a lot! There were 8K TVs, OLED TVs, QLED TVs, big TVs, small TVs. But it’s hard to explain how they’re meaningfully different than the fancy TVs we were excited about at CES last year. Well, for one, you can buy some of the coolest things now. We also saw completely new TV tech rear its head. And everything is big, big, big.

8K has dominated the TV announcements at CES this year. Despite there being no actual 8K content yet, everyone wants a piece of the next gen display action.

Here are all of the ones that were announced.

OK, it’s the first day of CES, which means the TV makers have all announced their TVs, and yes they’re all neat looking, especially the 8K TVs top manufacturers are promising to ship this year. They are legit beautiful—so why am I so underwhelmed?

Samsung is having a giant TV moment at CES this year.

Yesterday it announced a 219-inch version of its Mammoth Wall TV, as well as a 75-inch Micro LED set. Apparently that wasn't enough, because now we're also getting a 98-inch 8K QLED.

NASA just released the first ever 8K video shot in space. With help from the European Space Agency (ESA), astronauts collected a bunch of clips inside the space station — and a few looking out — using the Helium 8K camera by RED. You can download the original file on NASA's website. (It's over 3GB LOL.) However, you probably cannot find an 8K display on which to enjoy it.

Ahead of its press conference at IFA today, Samsung has announced its brand new 8K QLED Q900R. This follows an 8K TV announcement from LG yesterday and we have a feeling this will only be the start of an 8K trend in Germany this week.

Video: I love New York City. I live here, so I'm biased. You might hate New York, and think it sucks, and think it's dirty, and think people who live in New York talk about New York way too damn much. That's fine. You're actually more right than you know. But even you should be able to enjoy this fine video of New York City in glorious 8K. It's every important landmark, building, bridge, cityscape and thing you've seen a thousand times before in stupid TV shows and movies set in New York, painted with the most beautiful pixels I've ever seen.

See that up there? That's the world's first 10K television. You can't buy it. Chinese display manufacturer BOE made the 82-inch screen just for the bragging rights (first!). That's OK, though -- there's absolutely no reason to own a 10K TV right now.

What do you do when you want to show off a 4K TV? What about 8K? You use a $50,000-plus specialised digital still camera, find yourself a beautiful setting, and spend hours upon hours capturing a time-lapse video in 10K. Then you spend just as much time editing it, to show off the full extent of the detail hidden within those images. This is possibly the most detailed and most fascinating video that has been captured by a digital sensor up until now.

4K is for losers. The real mind-blowing screens at this CES are the giant 8K prototypes that will seriously blast your eyeballs. I just saw LG's 98-inch 4K-times-four OLED screen, and yes, it was absolutely insane. I'm not sure exactly how insane though because my eyes just aren't good enough.

Back in May of 2012 the NHK's science & Technology Research Lab in Japan successfully broadcasted an 8K, 7680x4320 signal over a distance of 2.7 miles using UHF frequencies. As a proof of concept it showed that 8K TV could be successfully delivered to televisions over the air, but it lacked the distance of traditional TV broadcasts.

The shrinkification of technology is as inevitable as death and taxes, but we still can't help but be excited to see that Japan's NHK, working with a company called Astrodesign, has managed to shrink an 8K-capable camera into this relatively compact package. Compared to the HD-capable smartphone in your pocket it's monstrous, but when put next to existing Ultra HD cinema cameras believe it or not this is tiny.