Tagged With 4k hdr

Sony have just dropped their brand new LED LCD range, and from my time with it I had to say that it's pretty damn impressive. In addition to offering beautiful display, it includes Smart technology that is a game changer when it comes to user experience.

Google's latest Chromecast dongle comes in at twice the cost of its predecessor. But for that price, it supports 4K video, and high dynamic range video. Using your phone as a remote control, it can wirelessly stream the best quality video possible from Netflix, YouTube, Stan and a host of other Google Cast apps. Is its $99 price worthwhile over the existing $59 Chromecast, though?

If you have a new (and probably quite expensive) 4K HDR TV, then 4K video is amazing -- it looks incredible. But to watch a 4K Blu-ray, you need a 4K Blu-ray player, which can set you back quite a few hundred dollars more than regular Blu-ray. If you do want to make that investment, though, the cheapest 4K Blu-ray player actually does a lot more than just play movies. You can buy a 4K-toting Xbox One S for as little as $349, a full $200 cheaper than the least expensive Blu-ray player on sale in Australia today.

Most LCD TVs either use a long string of LEDs around the edge of the panel or a thin sheet of LEDs across the back to light up their screens, meaning that large areas of the screen are lit by just a few LEDs -- and generally that's meant that LCDs have struggled to display bright whites alongside dark blacks. Sony's new Z9D TV, though, uses a full-array backlight with hundreds of individually-controlled LEDs, giving just about the most complex and powerful range of brightness across the display of any LCD TV you can buy today. And when you're watching the right movie, the difference is colossal.

When you plug your Blu-ray player, games console or media streaming box into a shiny new Full HD or Ultra HD LCD or OLED television, there's a lot that goes on behind the scenes to display an image correctly and at the highest quality possible. All TVs might seem (very roughly) equal when you see them in the store, but there's a lot of different aspects -- 4K, LED, HDR and more -- that you need to learn before you pick a new screen to buy. Here's our quick guide to all the important tech inside your TV.

When you watch a 4K TV, more often than not you're not actually watching 4K content -- broadcast TV, the vast majority of YouTube and Netflix, even Blu-ray video is a long way off the top quality able to be displayed on a high-end 4K HDR display. The secret sauce in Sony's new Z9D 4K HDR Android TV -- that's a mouthful -- is a new imaging processor that is 40 per cent more powerful than the previous generation, enabling some software tweaks that intelligently detect objects in video and adjust colour and contrast appropriately.

Here at Gizmodo, we like OLED TVs. We really like OLED TVs. But OLED is still mostly a technology for the top end of town, and if you want to buy a TV with a slightly more reasonable price tag then your only legitimate option is an LED-backlit LCD. LG, the OLED kings, also make a bunch of LED TVs, and first amongst those is the UH950T: a LED TV with the very best colour-gamut-enhancing quantum dot tech, with a native 4K resolution, a choice of 55-inch or massive 65-inch panels, and support for a new high dynamic range tech called Dolby Vision. It's a few grand cheaper than our favourite TV, but it doesn't sacrifice much at all to get there.