Tagged With 3d printing

Candle technology hasn’t changed much in thousands of years — you add fire to a wax-soaked wick, and it provides light for hours. It’s simple, it’s effective, and it doesn’t need an upgrade. So of course someone on the internet spent three years redesigning the candle from the ground up with digital guts — while managing to preserve its old-school usability.

The most effective way to block an annoying sound is to simply build a barrier — the thicker, the better. But instead of everyone living in sound-blocking caves in a few years as noisy drones criss-cross the skies, researchers at Boston University have engineered an acoustic meta material that’s designed to silence annoying sounds at their source, without blocking the movement of air.

If a large part of your day is spent on your feet, a good pair of shoes can only do so much to keep you comfortable. Every foot requires different levels of support and cushioning, and ideally, we’d all visit a pedorthist for a custom set of shoe inserts, were it not so expensive. Dr. Scholl’s has a cheaper $140 solution that uses your smartphone to help create 3D-printed insoles that are customised for every foot.

Mars is lacking in the vast supply of natural resources we've come to rely on here on Earth, and astronauts attempting to colonise, or even just visit, the red planet can only bring a limited supply of materials with them. Learning to make do with what Mars has to offer is one of the biggest challenges of visiting our nearest neighbour, but the results of the European Space Agency's latest 3D-printing experiments prove it isn't impossible.

Researchers have that found that 3D printers spew tiny particles into the air as they operate, though the quantity and nature of these potentially toxic aerosols are poorly understood. A new study identifies a startling variety of these emissions, and the conditions under which they’re produced.

Security experts have identified thousands of instances in which owners of 3D printers have made their devices available online and without the need for authentication. That certainly makes remote access to 3D printers convenient, but wow, what an awful idea given the tremendous potential for abuse.

Mastering a racing game is a lot easier with your hands on a steering wheel instead of a tiny thumbstick, but after shelling out hundreds of dollars on a console and $US60 ($82) on a game, do you really want to cough up another c-note for a racing wheel? If you've got access to a 3D printer, you could make this cheap rack and pinion mechanism instead and add a tiny thumb-steered wheel to your controller.

Not since Rick and Morty’s butter-passing robot has there been a more hyper-specific, purpose-built device than perhaps Alex Mikes’ automatic Kindle page turner. Instead of having to raise his arm to tap the edge of the screen while reading in bed, a simple click of a wireless remote makes the attached contraption do all of that hard work for him.

Five years ago, a lot of people thought Cody Wilson was a wild-eyed fanatic. The New Yorker described his rhetoric about making blueprints for 3D-printed guns available to anyone on the internet as "divorced" "from any practical reality." Yet here we are in 2018, and Wilson's company, Defence Distributed, is still in the news being branded as a threat to national security. President Donald Trump weighed in this week, and just yesterday, a federal court blocked the 30-year-old from relaunching his website. What the hell is happening?

Pediatric cardiac surgery is one of the most demanding medical specialties. It needs to deal with delicate structures - the heart of the newborn child can weigh only 20 grams, fitting in the palm of your hand.

3D printing is rapidly changing how these surgeries can be carried out.