Tagged With 2016 olympics

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

If you win at the 2016 Olympics, not only do you get yourself a gold, silver or bronze medal -- you also get a pretty nifty pair of shoes to take home with you as well. Adidas has an ultra-exclusive "winner's shoe" for the Olympic elite, 3D printed and with colour-coded laces to suit gold, silver and bronze.

According to former International Olympic Committee president Jacques Rogge, volunteers are invaluable at the Games. "Volunteers are true Olympians. They transmit the true spirit of the Olympic Games," Rogge said in 2012. Unfortunately, many volunteers this year appear to have ignored this and said "screw it" instead.

With the Olympics officially starting and the swimming events guaranteed to set a few more records, you have to wonder how swimmers can continue to improve? Haven't we reached the pinnacle of a human's physicality by now? If we get any more good at swimming in the water, we're going to continue doping, or we're going to become merpeople.

For two weeks, homeowners in Rio de Janeiro will have some highly desired real estate as people from around the world flock to the city (perhaps cautiously) to watch the Olympic Games. Basic economics would suggest the locals will engage in a little bit of price gouging. But woah, some people are getting super gutsy.

For top runners, like the elite specimens competing in the Olympics, every last thing you wear needs to be engineered for comfort and speed. So Nike and Zeiss took inspiration from human anatomy for a new pair of sunglasses that wrap around an athlete's head.

The 2016 Summer Olympics are scheduled to kick off in Rio de Janeiro in two weeks. The Games will undoubtedly draw many people, both in person and via broadcasts. But while the events themselves are the attraction, a new photo series from the Associated Press shows the devastating reality of what's happening just beyond the Olympic Village in Rio's violent, gang-dominated slums.

In preparation for the upcoming Olympics in Brazil, a British long jump champion is planning to freeze his sperm just in case he contracts Zika. It's meant as a precaution to prevent any future children from developing birth defects, but in reality it's a complete overreaction based on unfounded fears.