Science & Health

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For some, sneaking a mouthful of raw cookie dough while baking is an indelible -- and certainly delicious - part of the process. But while we've been told to avoid dough containing raw eggs, a new investigation confirms that tainted raw flour was responsible for an E. coli outbreak in 2016 - a finding that will surely test our temptation to lick the bottom of the bowl.

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Dolly the Sheep made biotech history in 1996 when she became the first animal cloned from adult somatic cells. She lived to the age of seven, which is young for sheep, leading scientists to speculate that her premature death had something to do with her being a clone. New research now shows this wasn't the case.

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The pendulum of scientific opinion swings pretty dramatically when it comes to the effect (if any) coffee has on our health.

But now a review of 200 separate studies has shown even three or four cups a day is still more likely to benefit your health than harm it. Woohoo!

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For 25 seconds in 1987, in the middle of WGN-TV anchor Dan Roan's sportscast, thousands of Chicagoans' feeds were replaced with a low analogue whine and the eery image of a masked man nodding over and over as if in a state of mania. "If you're wondering what's happened, so am I," Roan said to his audience once WGN regained control of the signal. What he couldn't have known is that the rest of the world would still be wondering to this day.

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If we're ever going to truly understand how our universe works, we'll need to take a lot of different measurements, but measuring can be one of science's most difficult tasks. How, for example, do scientists measure an invisible thing that passes directly through solid matter without stopping? The inventions scientists come up with to make this possible are often truly incredible - even if the measurements made are totally expected.

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To be a giraffe among giraffes, or a pigeon among pigeons, is to live at all times in that scene from Being John Malkovich - a world in which everyone you know looks pretty much exactly like you. However wondrously varied the animal kingdom might be, on a species-level its residents tend to look more similar than not - at least, from a human perspective. I'm not saying that all squirrels look identical - just that being a squirrel, and trying to distinguish your squirrel-spouse from your squirrel dad from your squirrel-mailman, seems like it would be pretty hard work.

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When an outbreak occurs, in order to effectively figure out how to stop it, researchers typically try to figure out how it started. The answer to that question, though, can be elusive. And as so-called superbug infections have spread across the country's hospitals, scientists and public health officials have subsequently struggled to understand how these pathogens spread.