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In just the last month, it feels like Bitcoin has surged to mainstream prominence, popping up on social media, TV, radio and just about anywhere information is exchanged. However, though Bitcoin may be the most popular cryptocurrency, it’s not the only one – arguably, it’s not even the best one.

We’ve rounded up the ways you can buy Bitcoin, other cryptocurrency and altcoins in Australia.

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Women simply aren't as good as men at programming. It's just biological. Women just aren't interested in technology. Women are too emotional. Men are more logical, so they code better. Women aren't as technically minded. Women have smaller brains than men. Women don't get very far in their careers because they need to leave to have babies. You wouldn't like the culture. Your nails would hit the wrong keys too much.

No but really, it's biological, it's just science. Women are better suited to caring jobs, like a nurse, or a childcarer.

These are real statements, said by real people - many of whom are working in tech - to excuse the lack of gender diversity in the industry. And it's combating statements like these that drives Holly Tattersall, CEO of mentorship program Women in Digital.

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Uber has been accused of a lot of very, very bad things over the course of its existence, including a culture of rampant sexual harassment, spying on competitors and users, and covering up hacks by paying off the hackers. But one of the worst things it's allegedly done was shadily obtaining the medical records of an 26-year-old female passenger raped by an Uber driver in India in order to try to discredit her account as an act of corporate sabotage.

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For years, Twitch.tv has been the web's go-to for gaming live streams, crowd-sourced experiments like Pokémon playthroughs and commenter-controlled investment portfolios and other bits of acceptably time-killing content. Unfortunately, this droll peace is being threatened by the internet equivalent of the dumb controversy surrounding desnudas in Times Square.

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However quickly artificial intelligence evolves, however steadfastly it becomes embedded in our lives -- in health, law enforcement, sex, etc. -- it can't outpace the biases of its creators, humans. Microsoft Researcher Kate Crawford delivered an incredible keynote speech, titled "The Trouble with Bias" at Spain's Neural Information Processing System Conference on Tuesday.

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Over the past four years Patreon has grown to become the de facto funding model for independent creators online - a platform where supporters pledge small monthly recurring donations that better support an enduring career instead of the need Kickstarter or GoFundMe's per-project setup fills. But an overhaul of its fee structure announced yesterday has creators furious and patrons leaving in droves.

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As privacy barriers have gradually been eroded online, it's become harder and harder to keep control over what you're revealing to the websites you visit when you open up a web browser. For many users now, revealing who you are is just an inevitable consequence of being on the web and using apps, but if you want to tighten the reins on where your data's going, you do have some options.

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As public and political sentiment shifts against the titans of Silicon Valley, the tech world's tactics in Washington are getting dirty. Google has been facing increased scrutiny lately, and Oracle has been doing its best to fuel the fire. In a new report about its latest attack, Oracle's political fixer in Washington, Ken Gleuck, threw around accusations that sound more like Steve Bannon than Steve Jobs.

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We're hitting a sort of news singularity with Bitcoin at this point. The rush to report price changes can't keep pace with the reality. In 24 short hours, its trading price has gone from around $US12,000 ($15,909) to $US16,000 ($21,212). Now the biggest question is: How long is it going to be before these investors are putting us all at risk?

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In its 23 years of existence, Yahoo made some really boneheaded deals. But of all of them, the deal to become Mozilla's default search engine might have been the worst. In that deal, Mozilla retained the right to walk away and still collect hundreds of millions of dollars a year - if Yahoo was acquired by a new company. Both of those things have occurred recently and now Yahoo's new owner is suing Mozilla.