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In 2012, Gatorade released Bolt!, a game for the iPhone that used the fastest man alive to inspire kids to try their best, remain dedicated, and always avoid water. Some people found this problematic — including California's attorney general. On Thursday, The Gatorade Company agreed to pay a $US300,000 ($376,720) settlement for promoted misleading and disparaging statements about water.

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Earlier this week, an episode of Netflix's children cartoon Maya the Bee was pulled after a hidden phallus was discovered by an angry parent. Now, the studio behind the cartoon looks to be pursuing charges against the penis-drawing artist. But in truth, sneaking dicks and other sex jokes into cartoons is weirdly long-standing animation tradition.

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Even though directors are in charge of creating movies, selling those movies to people is usually none of their business. Sometimes that can have consequences, like how the "Bohemian Rhapsody" trailer for Suicide Squad reportedly led to a rewrite of the movie's tone and structure. In other cases, it can actual spoil your biggest reveal — something Kingsman: The Golden Circle director Matthew Vaughn knows all too well.

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If you've ever seen a jellyfish in the wild, at an aquarium, or in one of those 11-minute-long relaxation videos on YouTube, you've probably wondered: What are jellyfish trying to do? What is their goal? The answer is not entirely obvious, as these barely sentient blobs seem to senselessly ferry themselves from one place to another just because they can. Now, new research gives overthinkers yet another reason to envy jellyfish. Apparently, some of these animals without brains might sleep pretty peacefully.

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The science news media has a pretty simple job: Find facts, and report them. Typically, this entails reading a scientific study, talking to the study's authors and outside experts, writing, and fact-checking the confusing bits with experts again. But sometimes, the narrative the media wants isn't actually supported by the study, or the experts. Such is the case with a new paper on climate change.

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He was just seven-and-a-half when he died some 49,000 years ago, an otherwise healthy Neanderthal boy whose cause of death remains a mystery. An analysis of his well-preserved skeleton is providing new insights into how these extinct humans developed and matured, revealing an extended period of growth in certain aspects compared to modern humans.

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A while back, I woke up to find my Android phone lingering at a pattern unlock screen. Not just to unlock my screen, but a prompt to decrypt all of my phone's data. I was puzzled. Every other morning, I decrypted my device using a 10-digit, alphanumeric passphrase — something I perceived, accurately, as being infinitely more secure than tracing a dumb pattern with my finger.

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Stand in awe of the small but mighty pumpkin toadlet. He might only be an inch long, but his skin is packed with some of the most potent toxins on Earth. Strutting proudly through the mulch, he lets out a series of high-pitched buzzes to let nearby females know that in this patch of damp, decomposing leaves, he is king — and ready for a queen. There's only one problem. As scientists explain in a new study published in Scientific Reports, those boastful calls fall on deaf ears. Literally.