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Five years ago, I threw away a hard drive. An utterly generic 250GB portable hard drive, already a few years old, with a couple of dings and scratches in its shell and with the beginnings of an audible click that would have eventually killed it.

It had a data file containing 1400 Bitcoin on it. No big deal, at the time.

Today, those few kilobytes are worth more than four million dollars.

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While rocket launches aren't typically thought of as "cute", watching the maiden voyage of Rocket Lab's Electron rocket is the closest we'll get to seeing the Brave Little Toaster go to space. Yesterday, the 17m carbon fibre rocket blasted off from New Zealand's Mahia Peninsula and made it to the edge of space. Though Electron didn't make it into orbit, it tried its best, and that's all that counts.

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On one hand, Injustice 2 delivers a funhouse-mirror take on DC Comics' biggest characters, exploring the characters in intriguingly divergent ways. On the other hand, because it's a fighting game, all the story needs to do is keep generating reasons for former Justice Leaguers to punch each other across the world. Injustice 2 gets to have its cake and eat it, too, and makes you want to keep on gorging right along alongside it.

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Imagine this thing that has actually happened: You're in the US when your infant develops a strangely-shaped skin lesion. Seeing this disgusting skin lesion and thinking it might be anthrax, you take your child to the doctor. "Doc, I think I my kid has anthrax," you might say. The doctor's eyes roll. "It's obviously a spider bite," doc probably replies. Turns out your kid had anthrax all along.

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Video: Jerónimo Rocha's sci-fi horror short Dédalo is reminiscent of Alien in both visuals and story. It follows a woman who appears to be the lone survivor of a gruesome attack on her space freighter. Her frantic struggle to survive is suspenseful as hell, but the real draw here is that alien creature, specifically its freakishly spiky nails. Claws? Talons? Whatever. Yikes!

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As companies like 23andMe and Ancestry.com help make genetic testing commonplace, you would think that people would become better at ensuring protections for the privacy of that data. Instead, multiple Congressional actions in the US threaten to erode already-weak protections against genetic discrimination. But it isn't just a dystopian Gattaca future where citizens are discriminated against based on their genes that we need to be worried about — one researcher is concerned that our inadequate genetic privacy laws will stymie science.

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If there's one thing on Earth we don't know enough about, it's the ocean. We've only mapped around five per cent of the seafloor, and two-thirds of the ocean's animal species might remain undiscovered. It shouldn't be a surprise that we're only now able to create detailed maps of the seafloor — but that doesn't stop each new one from being mind-boggling.

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Everyone knows the cure for existential ennui is the Three P's: Pail (of ice cream), Pink Floyd, and Pretty space pictures. While we can't provide you with ice cream or a psychedelic experience, we can offer you some truly sublime galaxy simulations that are sure to fill the void inside you — for now.

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The best part about science fiction, besides the explosions, space explorations and psychotic aliens, is the fact that it reveals our most human fears. While they aren't flesh and bone, robots are arguably most emblematic of our anxieties: Besides being smarter, faster and (sometimes) shinier than us, "bad robots" are a sci-fi favourite because they reveal how obsolete we might be becoming — or already are.

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When original Star Trek: Discovery showrunner Bryan Fuller and executive producer Heather Kadin were developing the series, they were both adamant about making sure that the show stayed true to Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry's vision of social progressiveness and inclusion. But for a vocal contingent of racist "fans", Discovery's emphasis on diversity is tantamount to "white genocide".