HTC Hopes Its Long-Awaited 5K Vive Pro 2 Headset Won’t Make You Sick

HTC Hopes Its Long-Awaited 5K Vive Pro 2 Headset Won’t Make You Sick
Image: HTC Vive

We haven’t seen a new HTC Vive virtual reality headset in a minute, but today, the company announced two new devices, including the Vive Pro 2.

The second-gen Vive Pro looks a lot like its predecessor, but nearly every core spec has been upgraded in some way. HTC’s latest high-end consumer VR headset sports a 5K resolution (2.5K to each eye), a wider 120-degree field of view, and a faster 120Hz refresh rate, all of which combines to prevent the motion sickness that people sometimes encounter on less sophisticated head-mounted displays, HTC said. The company also said it moved over to a new display with fast-switching RGB sub-pixels, so in addition to more resolution, graphics on the Vive Pro 2 should look extra sharp and colourful.

In a first for a VR headset, HTC said it worked with both Nvidia and AMD to add support for Display Stream Compression via DisplayPort 1.2, which is a visual compression technique used to reduce the amount of bandwidth needed to output video with practically no loss in image quality. And in a somewhat pleasant surprise, HTC said the Vive Pro 2’s minimum hardware requirements only include an Nvidia RTX 2080 GPU or a Radeon 5000-series card, which is good news for anyone who has had trouble getting their hands on a current-gen graphics card (which is pretty much everyone).

Image: HTC Vive Image: HTC Vive

The Vive Pro 2 features a handy knob for adjusting IPD (interpupillary distance) and built-in speakers that support 3D spatial audio, along with a revamped headband that delivers a more comfortable fit and a 50-50 weight balance.

One thing I was hoping to see that didn’t make the cut on the Vive Pro 2 is native wireless tethering for receiving video from a nearby PC. This means you still need a physical video cable unless you opt for Vive’s Wireless Adaptor, which is compatible with both the original Vive Pro and the new Vive Pro 2.

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Click through for more official pics of the Vive Pro 2.

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

Image: HTC Vive, Other

The other small bummer is that with a starting price of $US800 ($1,017) for just the headset, the Vive Pro 2 is still rather expensive compared to something like the Oculus Quest 2. That said, the Quest 2 does have a lower resolution display and a narrower FOV, so the old adage that you get for what you pay for still applies. Also, for people who might not already have base stations or controllers to pair with the Vive Pro 2, the headset will also be available as a kit with two Base Station 2.0 and two Vive controllers for $US1,400 ($1,780).

Editor’s Note: Stay tuned for local Australian pricing and availability.

The other new HTC Vive headset, the Vive Focus 3, is intended primarily for enterprise and large corporations, and in some respects, it’s actually the more interesting gadget of the two.

Powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon XR2 chip, the Vive Focus 3 is many ways like the Quest 2 but with even better optics. Not only does it have a 5K display similar to what you get in the Vive Pro 2 (but with a 90Hz refresh rate instead of 120Hz), it supports both standalone operation (no need for a nearby PC) and a wired mode, so you can get that full wireless experience or higher fidelity graphics from a tethered PC depending on your needs.

Photo: HTC Vive, Other

Photo: HTC Vive, Other

Click through for more official pics of the Vive Focus 3 and its new controllers.

Photo: HTC Vive, Other

Photo: HTC Vive, Other

Photo: HTC Vive, Other

Photo: HTC Vive, Other

Photo: HTC Vive, Other

Photo: HTC Vive, Other

Photo: HTC Vive, Other

Photo: HTC Vive, Other

Photo: HTC Vive, Other

Photo: HTC Vive, Other

The Focus 3 also features new controllers and a chassis featuring a magnesium alloy frame that HTC said is 20% lighter and 500% stronger than typical plastic. You also get inside-out tracking thanks to the four cameras on the outside of the headset, front and rear gaskets that can be changed out for easy cleaning, built-in speakers, and even a special audio privacy mode to prevent people from eavesdropping on you while you’re in a meeting. In a nod toward enterprise use, the Focus 3 comes with a swappable battery system that lets you slap on a fresh power pack in just a few seconds.

The Vive Focus 3 will cost $US1,300 ($1,653) and includes a two-year enterprise warranty, in addition to a whole suite of new business-focused software support and apps to help companies more easily transition from traditional office collaboration to working in VR.

Now technically, anyone can pay $US1,300 ($1,653) for a Focus 3 if what they want is essentially a Quest 2 with better specs, but unfortunately, the Focus doesn’t come with the same kind of software and support the average consumer wants, so unless you’re planning on tinkering around on your own, the Vive Pro 2 is likely the better option.

The Vive Focus 2 is available for pre-order today and officially starts shipping on June 4. The Vive Focus 3 arrives June 27.