The Tesla Cybertruck Might Never Come to Australia But You Can Still Reserve One For $150

The Tesla Cybertruck Might Never Come to Australia But You Can Still Reserve One For $150
Image: Tesla

By Elon Musk’s own admission, the meme-worthy Tesla Cybertruck may never land in Australia. But you can still join the $150 wait list if you’re in denial.

Musk told Automative News in early August the Cybertruck was never really intended to be sold outside of North America.

“We sort of made the decision to not make this a world truck,” Musk said.

"So it doesn’t comply with a lot of specifications, like it doesn’t comply with EU’s specs and stuff ... Maybe we can get, I don’t know, some exceptions to EU rules depending on how it’s classified."

Maybe. An entry to Australia's market is not mentioned but Musk did mention if sales for the vehicle bomb, Tesla would pivot to making a more "normal" truck.

Has anyone told Tesla Australia?

You wouldn't know it by looking at Tesla's site, however. The brand's local team is still happy enough to take $150 off you for the privilege of being added to the Cybertruck's wait list.

Image: Tesla

That deposit is thankfully refundable should Musk fall true to his word and make the Cybertruck a United States exclusive. As of writing, Tesla's Australian site does indicate production isn't expected to begin until late 2021. If you're wanting a Single Motor RWD production, that'll start in late 2022.

The price of a Tesla Cybertruck in Australia

A total price is not yet known but the Cybertruck will cost $US39,900 in the United States. This works out to be a little more than $55,000 in Australia — but don't expect that to be the actual cost. You'll need to factor in on-road costs, luxury car tax and other added extras.

For comparison, the entry-level Tesla Model 3 starts at around $US41,000 in the U.S. but in Australia, it's at $73,900 before on-road costs -- that's far higher than the direct currency conversion.

Gizmodo Australia asked Tesla how many Australians had signed up and paid the $150 deposit but it did not disclose the figure.

It's not the only Tesla model you'll need to pay to sit on the queue for. The Roadster, which was first announced in November 2017, requires an immediate upfront payment of $7,000. You'll then need to fork out a further $59,000 within 10 days of making the reservation for a car not expected to be released until at least 2022.

That's just for the standard version though. If you want to get in on the limited-run Founders Series — one of just 1,000 — you'll have to pay up that $7,000 too and then an eye-watering $319,000 within 10 days.

Maybe the Cybertruck deposit isn't so bad after all.