Tesla Just Dropped Prices In Australia (After Raising Them In March)

tesla price australia
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Tesla in Australia is synonymous with expensive but a recent price drop has made two models just a little more affordable. Tesla’s Model S and Model X have both dropped in entry-level price, as spotted by The Driven in late May, despite facing a substantial price hike back in March.

The Model S long range, which increased by $6,000 to $130,900, is now back to its pre-March price of $124,900. The performance range, however, will cheaper than its been in some dropping down to $139,990 after it was briefly increased to $145,900.

For the Model X, it was another notable drop though it still exceeded its pre-coronavirus pandemic price. The long range model will now sell for $138,990, down from its March price of $144,900. The performance model is slashed by $5,000 to $153,990.

The cost of the cheaper Model 3 range remains unchanged from its March price increase.

Gizmodo Australia contacted Tesla Australia to understand why the prices were lowered just months after they were increased.

It did not respond in time for publication but it’s suspected a recent price cut in those models in the United States and China might be a catalyst for the drop in local Tesla prices in Australia.

An overview of Tesla’s recent price changes in Australia

Model June 2020 entry-level price April 2020 entry-level price December 2019 entry-level price
Model X

(Long Range)

$138,990 $144,900 $133,900
Model X

(Performance)

$153,990 $159,900 $151,900
Model S

(Long Range)

$124,990 $130,900 $124,900
Model S

(Performance)

$139,990 $145,900 $143,900
Model 3

(Standard)

$73,900 $73,900 $67,900
Model 3

(Long Range)

$87,900 $87,900 $85,900
Model 3

(Performance)

$95,900 $95,900 $93,900

Of course, for many of us, even the cheapest entry-level Tesla is still far from reach. Despite Elon Musk also agreeing with this sentiment earlier this year, its cheapest offering, the Model 3, exceeds $70,000 making it safely within luxury car territory.

That means Australians with more modest earnings hoping do away with their petrol guzzlers for electric vehicles will be likely have to look to cheaper alternatives.

While not everyone’s first choice, the Nissan Leaf is an electric vehicle just scraping in under $50,000. Until Tesla provides an option somewhere closer to this price point, it remains a fantasy for many Australians.