Squeeze Out A Bag For Juicero, Which Is Dead Now

Dozens of people will no longer be able to use an over-engineered machine to squeeze cold press juice from a bag in the near future. Juicero, the startup that became a symbol of the tech industry's mission to solve problems no one has, is officially shutting down.

Image: Chrissy Trampedach

In a public statement, the company explained that over the last month it's been studying ways to bring the price of its overpriced $US399 ($502) juicers down to a still-overpriced $US200 ($252) range. Over time, the team began to realise that this goal just wasn't possible. As professional product designer Ben Einstein demonstrated in a detailed blog post back in April, the Juicero machine is a crazy piece of design. And as Bloomberg demonstrated in an article that certainly played a part in Juicero's demise, this complex machine doesn't squeeze out its pre-packaged bags of juice much better than a human can using their bare hands.

The statement explains:

We are confident that to truly have the long-term impact we want to make, we need to focus on finding an acquirer with an existing national fresh food supply chain who can carry forward the Juicero mission.

For the next 90 days, we are offering refunds for your purchase of the Juicero Press. Please contact [email protected] by December 1, 2017 to request a refund for your purchase. If you have an active Pack subscription, you will receive your final delivery next week (week of September 4th).

Today, a small number of people are figuring out what their future juice squeezing strategy will be (sorry Ivanka), and an even smaller number of people are likely regretting the $US118.5 million ($149 million) they invested in this company. It's hard to imagine a single person would consider buying its corpse.

[Fortune]


Comments

    The people who backed this product need to be slapped, and then banned from backing any startups for 15 years.

      Something tells me MF that they just got "slapped" haha, you wont need to ban them, they will be scared shitless to try it again ;)
      I personally feel its a testament to the ever growing "ignorance" of technology.

        My new startup is going to be a fruit/vege pouch attached to a bottle so you can freshly squeeze your juice wherever you are, at that point in time, then drink it straight from a brand new bottle.

        Neither the pouch nor the bottle will be recyclable. It will be nothing like the laughing stock that was Juicero.

      Nah I reckon it's a great idea to keep rich people funding pointless crap like this - if they're dumping their greed dollars into this sort of garbage, it means they've got less money to take over and gut otherwise good companies, or to inflate the price of useful things like houses and land.

    Sue them for every last drop of juice..
    Leave them without anything!

    That product breakdown blog is truly mind-boggling.

    Is it safe to assume that the asshats who came up with this thing will still pocket a not-insignificant percentage of that $120m for themselves when their company goes tits up? They should be jailed for fraud.

      Jailed for Fraud? I don't think so pal. The way these venture capitalist companies work is that they invest millions in hundreds if not thousands of startups. Some of them go nowhere like the Juicero, others get acquired by the giant tech companies for hundreds of millions, and some of them they just buy into so they can own a portion of the patents and sue hundreds of other companies for patent infringement.

      These venture capitalist funds likely have access to eye watering amounts of money and it only takes a few good payoffs per year to keep increasing that bill fold....the rich get richer!

      There's a great podcast about patents on the link below, listen to that and you'll never feel sorry for venture capitalists again.

      https://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/441/when-patents-attack

        Nah, not worried about the venture capitalists. Was thinking more about small business creditors supplying parts, labour and produce (i.e. veggies) who will be lucky to see 10 cents in the dollar even if someone buys the leftover assets or IP.

        Will check out the podcast, too. Thanks!

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