LG's New Super UHD TVs Use 'Nano Cell' Tech For Better Colour

Image: LG

CES is kicking off with its traditional showing of really fancy TVs. Combining all the good top-end stuff we're already used to like Dolby Vision HDR with new 'nano cell' tech that reportedly improves colour quality and viewing angles, LG's three newest Super UHD panels are the most advanced the company has produced — and promise the best ever picture quality from a LCD.

The crowning feature of the new Super UHD TVs is a 'nano cell' coating on the LCD panel, which absorbs errant wavelengths of light from each red, green and blue pixel in the screens' 4K display, allowing each colour to be recreated more accurately. It's the same concept as quantum dots, but uses even smaller particle sizes.

LG says it also improves the screens' off-axis viewing angle, with "virtually no colour difference" up to 60 degrees off the center axis of the panel. The screens are also certified by Hollywood's very own Technicolor, and have a bespoke picture mode for the most accurate possible out-of-the-box colour.

Image: LG

The company is doubling down on the diversity of HDR formats that it supports, too — like previous years, Dolby Vision and the industry standard HDR-10 are included but the new Super UHD screens can also decode the next-generation Hybrid Log Gamma HDR tech co-developed by the BBC and Japan's NHK and a competing HDR standard coming out from Technicolor.

There are three new models in LG's refreshed Super UHD LCD range — a flagship SJ9500, the slightly lower-specced SJ9000 and a more affordable SJ8500. The SJ9500 is one of the thinnest LCDs out there, measuring just 6.9mm thick at its thinnest point — although that's a common trick for TV manufacturers, who concentrate all the image-processing hardware into a thicker area at the centre of the panel.

We'll get eyes on with the new range over the next few days at CES 2017 in Las Vegas, so stay tuned for our early impression of the new screens. Expect them to drop onto Aussie shelves from around the middle of the year onwards. [LG]

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