New Costs for Metadata Retention Mean Your Internet Bill Could Soon Rise

Tracking and storing millions of users worth of metadata doesn't come cheap. So how much will the proposed lack of privacy cost you?

According to a study performed for the Attorney-General’s department by PricewaterhouseCoopers the upfront costs to implement the storage regime are between $188.8 million and $319.1 million. While that’s less than 1 percent of the telecommunications $43 billion annual revenue, it’s still a big chunk of money that will probably come out of users pockets. Some of the big players, such as iiNet and Optus have suggested that it will cost another $100 million a year to hang on to user’s data for the two years required and keep the scheme running. It’s also possible that it will actually cost more, as certain features, such as encryption for the metadata, was not part of the costing exercise. For the full back-story on metadata retention, check out our write-up from last year as well as the latest update.

Not surprisingly the costs involved with the data retention act have people up in arms, so one crafty software engineer figured out a direct line to voice displeasure to our members of parliament. There is currently a grassroots campaign urging people to help out curious George by copying him in on all your emails.

We like 'Curious George'. He's such a clever little monkey. But he's really not too technical. Please pledge below to help George feed his insatiable curiosity. All you need to do is to cc [email protected] on all your emails. Easy!

There are plenty of other reasons to get in touch with your favourite politicians. Just a few weeks ago the Communications Alliance put out a draft anti-piracy scheme that would have the ISP industry enforce a three strike regime. Get up to date with our coverage of the issue before you voice your displeasure. [SMH]

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