Intel Thinks 40% Of Consumer Laptops Will Be 'Ultrabooks' By The End Of 2012

Intel took the opportunity at Computex in Taipei to unveil its most recent processor roadmap today. The big news? It's created a new category of thin, lightweight computers which it's dubbed "Ultrabooks", which it claims will account for 40 per cent of personal laptops by the end of 2012. Big call.

The Ultrabooks are destined to be less than 2cm thick and have retail prices starting at under $US1,000 (so under $1,200 AUD, then?) and will be powered by the current and next generation of the Core processors, Sandy Bridge and the upcoming Ivy Bridge.

With Ivy Bridge processors set to launch early next year, Intel is releasing its first 22nm chip that will be complimentary with both USB 3.0 and Thunderbolt connectivity.

Intel also announced at Computex that it is smashing Moore's Law out of the park when it comes to its Atom processor, which will move from 32nm to 22nm to 14nm within three successive years, making more powerful and efficient processors and boosting battery life in all Atom-based devices. That includes the Google Honeycomb tablet that was shown off during the event, as well as a whole raft of tablet and smartphone devices that will be powered by the "Medfield" chip.

In other words, smaller, faster, lighter and cheaper is the essence of it. Who could possibly complain about that?

[Intel]

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