Nakagin Capsule Tower Looks to be From the Future, But Probably Won’t Make it There

Nakagin Capsule Tower Looks to be From the Future, But Probably Won’t Make it There
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The unique Nakagin Capsule Tower in Tokyo is a futuristic-looking architectural marvel. But without local support for maintenance and preservation, it may not survive long enough for the future to see it.


Nakagin was built in the Metabolist style of the 1970s by late Japanese architect Kurokawa Kisho. The tower rises 14 floors and is composed of 140 individual capsules designed to be either apartments or business offices. PingMag has an amazing expose on the building and more on Japan’s Metabolism movement.

The Metabolism movement wanted to create a new system of architecture—focused on adaptable, growing and interchangeable building designs–and is probably the forefather of things like stackable prefab housing.

Unfortunately, the complicated nature of the Nakagin building, as well as several design flaws thanks to a rushed drafting schedule, may have ensured its demise. Budgetary concerns over repairing and maintaining the building caused residents to vote that it ought to be demolished. With it goes an integral piece of Japanese architectural history. [PingMag]