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The Miracle Stick That Makes Wine Taste Better In Seconds

The tricky thing about wine — especially the fancy stuff — is that since it gets better with age, what you buy off the shelf isn’t necessarily always at its peak. A few seconds with the Clef du Vin, though, will age it to perfection. And, if you’re not careful, all the way around to bad again.


Happy Hour: How Atomic Bombs Help Unmask Counterfeit Wine

As long as rich men are willing to pay exorbitant amounts for old, fermented juice, there will be schemers willing to dupe them out of their money. But if you’re dropping a cool half million on four bottles of wine supposedly owned by Thomas Jefferson (true story), you want to make sure you have the real thing, right? You can, thanks in part to the atomic bomb.


Why Astronauts Were Banned From Drinking Wine In Outer Space

The story behind NASA’s brief embrace of extraterrestrial sherry is a curious one. In the early seventies, the agency’s focus was shifting from short, Moon-focused missions to possibility of longer-term inhabitation of space. A revamped menu was among the most pressing challenges: food on the Gemini and Apollo programs came in dehydrated cube form, or squeezed from a pouch, and was universally regarded as inedible.


Inspired Alcoholic Pairings For Your Fast Food Weekend With Mates

Sure, beer and a burger is a match made in heaven. But like a sommelier at charcoal chicken shop, we’ve got the perfect drinks to complement your disgusting food choices.


Wacky Waving Inflatable Tubes Save Vineyards From Grape-Stealing Birds

The tension between grape growers and hungry birds is at an all-time high. Standard-issue scarecrows have proven ineffective. Air cannons no longer startle. It’s time to call in the secret weapon. Summon the Wacky Waving Inflatable Arm Flailing Tube Men.


The Discovery Of A 3700-Year-Old Cellar Reveals The Origins Of Wine

Wine is old as hell and probably came from Israel, based on the discovery of a 3700-year-old cellar in the city of Tel Kabri. What did the wine of yesteryear taste like? Accounts range from “medicinal” to “hints of cinnamon”.


Happy Hour: Why Genetically Engineered Grapes Would Make Great Wine

I am 99.9 per cent sure that there will never be commercial production of genetically engineered wine grapes (“GMO” to use the common misnomer). Even so, I’d like to indulge in imagining what could be if we lived in some parallel universe where rational scientific thinking prevailed.


This Scratch-And-Sniff Wine Guide Will Make You An Unpretentious Expert

For non-connoisseurs and two-buck-chuck aficionados, there’s a moment of minor social panic when dining out and it’s time to select a bottle of the good stuff for the table. “Oh gosh,” you think. “Don’t ask for my opinion. I do not have an opinion. Don’t pour that first sip for me. Don’t make me swirl the glass like I know what I’m doing. Please for the love of all things holy just bring us the basic House whatever and let’s move onto the food.”


How A Total Accident Saved The French Wine Industry

Amy Harmon’s excellent, recent article in the New York Times describes how the Florida orange juice industry may soon be wiped-out because of a new bacterial disease spread by an introduced insect. It looks like there could be a technology-fix for the problem using genetic engineering. The question is whether the growers will get to apply that solution.


The 'Smell' Of Tainted Wine Is Actually Your Nose Going Numb

Wine lovers dread “cork taint”, the mildewy, wet-garage-full-of-old-newspapers odour that ruins a freshly opened bottle of wine. But the chemical responsible for cork taint’s foul smell may actually work by numbing your nose’s scent receptors. Huh?


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