Weapons

Watch A Tiny Sword Forged From Two Nails (And The World's Cutest Anvil)

Imagine a sword. Now think of words that match with that image. Sharp. Steel. Cutting. S-words for $400. None of those are “adorable”, “cute” or “dainty”. But one look at this tiny blade, smithed by the person (or persons) behind Inspire To Make, and you’ll be hunting around for your own miniature tools to forge your own.


The State Of America's Nuclear Bases Is Even More Dire Than We Thought

We’ve known for a while now that the state of the US military’s nuclear infrastructure is… lacking. Like, still-uses-floppy-disks lacking. But according to a New York Times report, American nuclear silos are much more dangerously decayed than anyone thought.


The Destructive Low-Cost Precision Of The Excalibur Artillery Shell

“Raytheon is testing a new laser-guided 155mm artillery shell which adds laser-designation to GPS guidance in order to provide more targeting options and better pinpoint targets on-the-move,” reports DoD Buzz. It’s called the Excalibur S.


Monster Machines: Why The US Navy Is So Concerned About These Russian Missiles

Some folks question why the US Navy would need such exotic weapons as the Phalanx and SeaRAM systems, or even electromagnetic rail guns. These Russian-made, radar-guided anti-ship missiles are two such reasons.


How Fighter Jets Lock On (And How The Targets Know)

The primary technology that a military aircraft uses to lock and track an enemy aircraft is its onboard radar. Aircraft radars typically have two modes: search and track. In search mode, the radar sweeps a radio beam across the sky in a zig-zag pattern. When the radio beam is reflected by a target aircraft, an indication is shown on the radar display. In search mode, no single aircraft is being tracked, but the pilot can usually tell generally what a particular radar return is doing because with each successive sweep, the radar return moves slightly.


How The Taser Was Invented

Early use of an electronic control device, like the TASER, by law enforcement occurred in the 1960s when American police officers used electric cattle prods to disperse Civil Rights activists. As for the earliest cattle prods, this came about when inventor John Burton of Wichita, Kansas received a patent (US427549 A) in the late 1800s for such a device.


How To Sight-In Your Rifle For The Perfect Long-Range Shot

Your rifle is only as accurate as you make it. Here’s how to sight it in for tight clusters and long-distance shooting.


A Real Battle In Space Would Be Boring, Slow And Deadly

No one really knows what an actual space battle would look like, or even how it would be conducted. The conditions we’re used to on Earth — having an atmosphere and the pull of gravity — aren’t so applicable in the vast expanse above us. Of course, we can still theorise about the details based on our current knowledge and well, if you were expecting Star Trek or Star Wars to be on the money, prepare to be disappointed.


Why Military Tech (Sometimes) Doesn't Evolve

Consider the SR-71 Blackbird. It was meant to be used as a high altitude, high velocity recon aircraft. It was, and still is, one of the USAir Force’s greatest accomplishments, technologically speaking.


Inside The Former Soviet Union's Secret Nuclear Test Cities

Though it played out on the international stage, the arms race between the United States and the USSR took place mainly in rural, isolated parts of the world. The Americans tested their nuclear bombs on a desolate patch of Nevada. The Russians chose a barren polygon-shaped patch of what is now Kazakhstan.


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