Tagged With voip

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Tom Wheeler, the newly crowned chairman of the Federal Communications Commission in the US, has ambitious plans. He's already on a crusade to get carriers to allow mobile phone unlocking, and now he plans to rewrite the technology that supports America's ageing landline phone network.

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Skype has long claimed to be "end-to-end encrypted", an architectural category that suggests conversations over the service would be difficult or impossible to eavesdrop upon, even given control of users' internet connections. But Skype's 2005 independent security review admits a caveat to this protection: "defeat of the security mechanisms at the Skype Central Server" could facilitate a "man-in-the-middle attack" (see section 3.4.1).

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In the past several weeks, EFF has received many requests for advice about privacy tools that provide technological shields against mass surveillance. We've been interested for many years in software tools that help people protect their own privacy; we've defended your right to develop and use cryptographic software, we've supported the development of the Tor software and written privacy software of our own. This article looks at some of the available tools to blunt the effects of mass surveillance.

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What do you get if you feed iiNet's BoB a healthy dose of steroids? Budii, a combined modem, Android handset and tablet device that iiNet says it'll start selling soon.

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Since launch, Skype has been regarded as secure and private, with its strong encryption and complex peer-to-peer network connections making calls almost impossible to intercept. Since Microsoft bought it out, though, things have been changing — and Slate suggests your privacy may not be what it once was.

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The NBN isn't just a data network; the eventual aim of the rollout is to replace the copper network that not only provides ADSL (if you're lucky enough), but also voice services. NBN Co's announced that it's fast-tracking automatic user authentication to allow NBN-based VoIP services to roll out more smoothly.

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The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) continues to bust communications providers whose plans aren't described clearly. Today it announced a $13,200 fine for TPG over terms associated with its offering of 'free' VOIP calls for broadband customers.