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Cities Band Together To Deal With Uber, Airbnb

Such is the power of Uber and Airbnb they have inspired international cooperation in this uncertain world. Mayors from 10 cities worldwide are working together to write a unified “rulebook” for how to deal with these companies.


Uber Trying Out Call-In Ride Hotline

Now that Uber owns the loyalties of tech-savvy folks, it wants to charm another population: People without smartphones. Starting next month, the company will experiment with a service that lets people call in to request a car. For now, it will only be available in a Florida county that already partnered with Uber to help fix public-transit problems.


Soon You'll Be Able To Schedule Uber Rides

So much for “on demand” meaning “right this moment”. Uber is moving beyond the “on-demand economy” by testing a feature that lets users schedule a ride anywhere from 30 minutes to one month in advance. Car companies, beware.


There Are Less Drink Driving Fatalities In Cities With Uber

Every year in Australia hundreds of people are killed in car crashes that involve a drunk driver, and 30 to 40 per cent of global road deaths are caused by alcohol, according to the World Health Organisation. As could be expected, most alcohol related incidents happen late at night, over the weekend.

It turns out (unsurprisingly) when faced with a reliable alternative, people are less likely to drink and drive after a dinner or night out. With non-existent or severely limited public transport at the highest-risk times, access to ridesharing services (not just Taxis) has now been shown to result in fewer drunk driving deaths.


The Three Most Profound Conversations I've Had In An Uber

I love talking to my passengers. Our conversations usually flow with ease and end with the exchange of warm pleasantries: “Good luck with that job interview”, or “I hope you get some sleep on the flight.” I can vividly recall three conversations, however, that didn’t end in that fashion. Three passengers and three conversations that left me speechless, not for a brief moment as I stumbled over words, but even now as I think about what they told me.

Here are the three most profound conversations spoken in my Uber.


Would Fixed Taxi Fares Lure You Away From Uber?

Ingogo recently announced its new “fixed fares” platform for taxis, which is available from today. The bookings company says that uncertainty about cost is a major factor for passengers utilising ride-share services instead.


Uber Says Riders Are Willing To Pay The Most When Their Phone Battery Is Dying

When our phones are dying we sometimes do desperate things. And the ride-hailing company Uber knows that. The company recently admitted that riders with a dying battery are willing to pay the most in surge pricing. But they insist they’d never use this knowledge to raise rates on desperate people.


This Is Our First Good Look At Uber's Self-Driving Car

In a blog post yesterday, Uber officially showed off the self-driving car that’s been stealthily cruising around Pittsburgh city streets. The car is a hybrid Ford Fusion, one of the more impressive autonomous research vehicles out there, and is currently in the early stages of safety testing.


Ingogo To Offer Fixed Fares For Taxi Rides

Taxi providers and app services are taking a look at why people are turning towards ride sharing, and addressing the problems customers have with the traditional taxi service. One of the most common complaints travellers have using taxis is the uncertainty in price before getting into the vehicle — and taxi booking app Ingogo is changing that.

Ingogo is introducing fixed fares — an Australian first. So from next week, if you’re using Ingogo to book a cab, you won’t need to worry how much the fare will cost, since you’ll already know.


Lyft Is Willing To Pay $36.9 Million To Keep Its California Drivers As Contractors

Lyft has offered to settle a case against its California drivers for a sum of $US27 million ($36.9 million). The money would allow the company to keep its drivers as contractors, rather than making them employees.


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