Tagged With tvs

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Last week, we all had our minds blown by the realisation that Marvel's movies just look a bit flat. Visually stunning, sure, with amazing CGI and flawless cinematography, but also with mastering and grading that leaves blacks looking grey and scenes looking washed out. But there's a way to fix that. Here's how.

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The tail end of the year is always a good time to buy some new tech: new gadgets generally launch between March and September, and pre- and post-Christmas sales means prices can drop pretty significantly. To that end, JB Hi-Fi has a bunch of late November price drops on big-screen TVs from Samsung and LG.

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There's a moment playing Infamous First Light, as the heroine made of light climbs up a wall in pitch black darkness, that I fully appreciate the hype around the PS4 Pro. The woman is a multicolored bundle of light particles and thanks to HDR, I can make out each particle and note the way they each cast their own vibrant glow on on the red brick wall. Normally, she'd be a big blob of light, but high dynamic range gives you details in moments of extreme brightness and extreme darkness. I'm watching the next big step in video games, and it is extraordinary.

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Someone asked me recently what home theatre setup I'd build myself if money was no issue. I'm not talking about an actual theatre — I'd rather just go to the movies for that — but here's what I'd buy myself. If you have an appropriately fat bank account, enough space at home and an afternoon to buy everything, here's what you should get.

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Most LCD TVs either use a long string of LEDs around the edge of the panel or a thin sheet of LEDs across the back to light up their screens, meaning that large areas of the screen are lit by just a few LEDs — and generally that's meant that LCDs have struggled to display bright whites alongside dark blacks. Sony's new Z9D TV, though, uses a full-array backlight with hundreds of individually-controlled LEDs, giving just about the most complex and powerful range of brightness across the display of any LCD TV you can buy today. And when you're watching the right movie, the difference is colossal.

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When you're buying your lunch today, you might want to take a moment and spend a little more. Gizmodo's Lunch Time Deals posts point out any particularly good bargains for Aussie bargain hunters around the 'net. This week, JB has a deal for 10 per cent off a bunch of different Apple Macs, as well as the same 10 per cent off Ultra HD Sony TVs.

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4K TVs have come a long way. They used to be expensive, there was nothing to watch on them and you could do better for less buying 1080p. That's not the case any more: There's plenty to watch, new 4K panels have a ton of features and they're affordable enough for everyone now. If you've been waiting, now it's safe to start looking.

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So you've just bought a new TV. Maybe it's a cheap one that you picked up at Aldi. Maybe you got a great deal on a really expensive one from your mate at the hi-fi shop. Either way, the second you set it up, there are a few small tweaks that you can do to make it look better than it already does. You can spend zero dollars on this or you can spend a couple of hundred, but the result that you get will be a noticeable improvement.

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Ever since LCD TVs hit the scene about 10 years ago, we've seen small and incremental changes — better backlighting, higher quality panels. The last couple of years has been tumultuous, though, and 4K is now a thing (you'd be silly to buy a TV without it). With that done, TV makers are back to the minor iterative updates. But it's 2016, and even those updates are pretty damn cool.

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When you plug your Blu-ray player, games console or media streaming box into a shiny new Full HD or Ultra HD LCD or OLED television, there's a lot that goes on behind the scenes to display an image correctly and at the highest quality possible. All TVs might seem (very roughly) equal when you see them in the store, but there's a lot of different aspects — 4K, LED, HDR and more — that you need to learn before you pick a new screen to buy. Here's our quick guide to all the important tech inside your TV.

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If you're buying a TV this year — and it's a good year to buy a TV — then you have only a few choices to make before you've picked out a great screen. As well as working out whether you want 4K or HDR, and what screen size you're after in the first place, and what inbuilt smart features you want, your main choice is what TV backlighting technology you want your new big-screen telly to use. We're here to tell you the difference between edge-lit and back-lit LED, LCD and OLED, quantum dot and local dimming, and more.

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Lots of TVs look good when they're turned on, with bright and vibrant colours and fancy on-screen interfaces. Sometimes it's hard to tell the difference. But flick them off, and most — most, not all — look a bit weird, ugly and cheap. Not any more. Samsung's most expensive TV for 2016 looks just as good when it's switched off as it does when it's switched on. If you think about it, that's kind of important.

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Saying "I don't own a TV" is a good way to let people know that you're a pretentious arsehole. But even though more and more people are eager to tell you they don't "have TV," don't be fooled! You better believe that they are still "watching TV."

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If you've watched TV or a movie, or played a console game, in a dark room, then you'll know that after a short while it can be really fatiguing on your eyes. That's why backlights — like Philips' Ambilight — are so useful. This new Kickstarter gadget could give you a bright, colourful, real-time backlight for any TV, regardless of what console or Blu-ray player or other device you have plugged in.

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Video: This side-by-side comparison video of 4K HDR Ultra HD and Blu-Ray doesn't show the true technological difference between the two (because things get lost in translation when it ends up as a video on YouTube). But it does illustrate how there is a visual difference between the two that goes beyond just more resolution. 4K TVs are often disregarded because we can't appreciate the resolution unless the screen is much bigger than usual, but with 4K allowing for high dynamic range, Ultra HD movies can pack a much better colour punch.