Tagged With time

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Like many of us who are suffering from Post US Election Stress Disorder, I went to the movies this week and saw Arrival, the new sci-fi Oscar contender starring Amy Adams. If you haven't seen it, stop reading right now and go check it out.

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Flight is one of those evolutionary wonders that's hard to fully appreciate with two squishy eyeballs and a linear sense of time. But we're no longer limited to what nature gave us, thanks to the wonders of photo editing. As Barcelona-based photographer Xavi Bou shows, a few simple tricks can reveal the dizzying artistry of a bird rustling its wings.

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Video: This quirky animation from CraveFX starts off innocently enough, a janitorial worker mops up a leaky refrigerator and then picks up a coin on the ground. It's not until you see what causes the refrigerator to leak and why the coin is on the ground that you realise that you're watching an intricate moving puzzle piece before your eyes. The characters are stuck in an infinite loop caused by another character in their own infinite loop. It's chaotic and great and hard to keep up with.

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In the 150 years since Charles Darwin recognised the kinship of all life, scientists have worked to fulfil his dream of a complete Tree of Life. Today, the methods used to trace the evolutionary branches back through time would exceed Darwin's expectations. Scientists across a range of biological disciplines use a technique called the molecular clock, where the past is deciphered by reading the stories written in the genes of living organisms.

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Before dot-matrix displays took over the known world, Nixie tubes — glass lightbulbs containing light-up tubes for the digits 0-9 — were the best way of displaying changing numbers. One designer had the bright idea of taking the Nixie tube technology (and bulbs), and building a surprisingly beautiful analogue clock.

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Today at 9:59am, we get a minute that is 61 seconds long. This is a pretty rare occurrence, but why is it happening — and perhaps more importantly, what are the best ways to take advantage of all that extra free time?

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Most people would feel they can count on one day comprising the same number of hours, minutes and seconds as the next. But this isn’t always the case – June 30 will be a second longer this year with the addition of a leap second, added to reconcile the differences between two definitions of time: one astronomical, the other provided by atomic clocks.

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A month is hardly a unit of measurement. It can start on any day of the week and last anywhere from 28 to 31 days. Sometimes a month is four weeks long, sometimes five, sometimes six. You have to buy a new calendar with new dates every single year. It's a strange design.

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In the world of watchmaking, MB&F has always had a soft spot for creating the occasional mechanical marvel that can't be strapped to a wrist. Such as the company's latest creation, a robot named Melchior that can't vacuum floors, clean windows or open doors, but can keep track of the time while serving as an awesome piece of eye candy on your desk.

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If you want to know exactly what time it is, head of over to Boulder, Colorado, where a fountain of cesium atoms ticks off the U.S.'s official time. It should be accurate for the next 300 million years. But don't be impressed — the world's actual most precise clock is a few miles away at a different lab in Boulder, and it supposed to keep perfect time for 5 billion years, the age of our universe.

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Conflict photographers regularly report from war zones and disaster areas. This is tough stuff — creating images of anguish and death and upset, remaining distanced from the events without affecting and influencing them or losing your humanity. For something different, TIME assigned a photographer to catalogue the disaster of The Last Of Us: Remastered.