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Canon's New EOS 5D Mark IV Lets You Focus After Shooting

Canon’s best camera just got even better. The new EOS 5D Mark IV has a 30.4-megapixel full-frame sensor, will record 4K video, and can snap away at 7 frames per second, but it’s also the first Canon SLR that lets you focus after you’ve taken a photo.


Ask Gizmodo: Where Can I Sell My Second-Hand Camera?

Hi Gizmodo, I was wondering if you could help me. I have a question. I have been the proud owner of a very nice Canon 7D camera for the last few years, and have some nice lenses to boot — a 24-70mm Canon L lens, a 30mm Sigma prime, and a 50mm f/1.8 Canon prime.

But I’d like to upgrade. I’m eyeing off the Sony Alpha mirrorless cameras, but I don’t have the money to just go out and buy something off the shelf. So I was wondering: what if I trade my camera in? Or should I sell it as second-hand on a forum somewhere? Yours sincerely, Totally Not Alex Walker


What It's Like To Drive A Hot Wheels Car On A Twisting Daredevil Track

Video: Every time a kid sends a Hot Wheels car hurdling down a twisty track, in the back of their mind they’re imagining what it would be like to be at the wheel of that tiny vehicle. With a GoPro Hero4 Session strapped to the roof, this video, featuring eight different track sections cleverly edited together, is as close as you’ll ever get to experiencing what it’s like to actually drive a Hot Wheels.


Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark II: Australian Review

Here’s my camera wishlist: I want it to be easy to use, not overly complicated, take great images that don’t need a lot of post-processing in a range of environments, be portable (as in small enough to pop in my bag comfortably, rather than needing a bag of its own) and not — possibly most importantly — die immediately if I accidentally drop it.

The Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark II promises to deliver on this wishlist of mine — not only is it sturdy (read on to find out just how sturdy) and compact, it boasts Canon’s new DIGIC 7 processor, coupled with a 1-inch 20.1 megapixel CMOS sensor and 4.2x optical zoom lens — which makes for a photographic package that all but eliminates the need for anything but the most basic editing.


Watching Pills Dissolve Through A Macro Lens Is Both Gross And Gorgeous

You pop some paracetamol or ibuprofen and don’t give much thought to the journey it’s about to take through your body. But what if you could capture part of that trip? You know, the pretty part when it’s dissolving in your fluids. Doesn’t sound like tempting viewing, but photographer Ben Ouaniche has delivered a fair approximation.


For Sale: 158kg Soviet Spy Satellite Camera Lens, A Bargain At $24,000

So, you thought Canon had some ridiculously large lenses. The truth is, it ain’t got nothing on the former Soviet Union, which came up with this fearsome beast — a 158kg, 1.3m lens for its spy satellites. Oh yeah, it’s also for sale.


This 12K Timelapse Of Los Angeles Is Insanely Detailed

Video: Watch it on a big, high-resolution screen and 4K video looks awesome. 12K video is even more incredible — even though we don’t have screens that can show it off to its full potential yet — because it means you’re able to zoom in to a tiny portion of the frame and still see perfect detail. Shot by Joe Capra of Scientifantastic, this 100-megapixel time-lapse of Los Angeles, shot on a camera worth more than $100,000, shows just how amazing high-res video can be.


Crushing Old Cameras With A Hydraulic Press Is Tragically Fascinating

Video: While I usually enjoy a good crush on the hydraulic press every now and then, this one felt particularly painful. In its latest video, the Hydraulic Press Channel decided to crush two vintage Canon and Nikon SLR cameras followed up with the complete decimation of a lens (which actually puts up a pretty good fight).


These 50-Megapixel Hasselblad X1D Photos Are Something Else

Honestly, there’s going to come a time when cameras in the same vein as Hasselblad’s new X1D will be able to take photos of infinity. I’m not sure what infinity looks like, but we’re inching closer if these images from photographer Ming Thein are anything to go by.


Impossible Project I-1 Polaroid Camera: The Gizmodo Review

In 2008, Polaroid announced it would no longer produce instant film. Then, the Impossible Project took the opportunity to buy up what little was left of this division of the company and has spent the last eight years reformulating and reviving the once-popular original format instant film. The I-1 ($US300) is Impossible’s first proprietary camera, and it has done an excellent job of marrying the old school format with new school technology. It’s basically a funky-looking Polaroid camera you can control with your phone.


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