Tagged With surveillance

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Twitter just announced that it's revoking a surveillance service's access to Twitter data. In September, the Daily Dot reported that the Denver Police Department was paying $US30,000 ($39,435) to use a tool made by Geofeedia that aggregates information from tweets and other social media. Today, the American Civil Liberties Union has even more information on how the tool was being used, prompting Twitter's action.

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In 2006, then-New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg issued an executive order establishing the Office of Special Enforcement, a citywide agency responsible for enforcing "quality of life" regulations — a nebulous, ideologically charged concept that refers to anything from music venues with too many noise complaints to nightclubs that facilitate prostitution to decrepit structures that pose a fire hazard.

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Our modern environment is saturated with wireless signals, a consequence of our insatiable desire to transmit data seamlessly and efficiently. A new device developed by scientists at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) can use these ubiquitous signals to detect our inner emotional states.

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Next week, Oliver Stone and the kid from 3rd Rock from the Sun plan to bring the story of NSA leaker Edward Snowden to a wider audience with the release of Snowden, their new You've Got Mail remake. Sadly, US Congress has yet to issue an official review of the movie, but the House intelligence committee released the next best thing with its report on Snowden himself and boy, is it a doozy.

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The importance of algorithms in our lives today cannot be overstated. They are used virtually everywhere, from financial institutions to dating sites. But some algorithms shape and control our world more than others — and these ten are the most significant.

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Not long ago, fingerprints were the cutting edge of biometric profiling. Today, the use of biosignatures to identify individuals has expanded to include everything from iris and facial scans right through to DNA profiling and even the unique shape of a person's arse. Here's what you need to know about how companies and governments are tracking your biometrics.

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The New York Police Department has admitted to using controversial cell phone spying systems known as Stingrays — which can be used to track the location and intercept personal communications of nearby mobile phone users. In a report from the New York Civil Liberties Union, the NYPD confirmed using the Stingray more than 1000 times between 2008 and May 2015.

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If you listen to FBI Director James Comey or GOP US presidential candidate John Kasich, encryption is a dangerous techno-blight that lets bad guys "go dark" and plot in secret. Actual tech experts are puncturing these scaremongering claims, and a new report tells a very different story: "Going dark" is alarmist nonsense. Technology provides myriad novel opportunities to spy on enemies.

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If you've visited Disneyland, you may have seen a small plane fly overhead at one point. The OC is full of rich-arse people, might be a Newport Beach golfer, no big deal, right? Except, as it turns out, the Anaheim police department had access to military-grade dragnet phone spying equipment, the kind that can suck up your phone's information from an aeroplane along with thousands of others.