surgery

Train For Surgery Using Immersive 3D Holograms Of Corpses

Computer-generated models are starting to let researchers and students peer into the body without needing a real human stretched out before them. Virtual dissection tables have been built at places like Stanford and the University of Calgary. Now, http://ns.umich.edu/new/releases/22078-students-virtually-dissect-hologram-like-3-d-cadaver computer scientists and biologists have taken the technology another step forward, using projectors, joysticks and 3-D equipment to build a floating holographic human that users can dissect, manipulate and put back together as they wish.


Testing Is About To Begin On These Futuristic Robot Space Surgeons

If you’re an astronaut on your way to Mars, there aren’t too many options if your appendix bursts. That’s why a technology company has developed mini robot space surgeons that can actually climb inside of astronauts’ bodies. The first zero-gravity tests on the machine are about to begin.


Doctors Are About To Start Human Trials For Suspended Animation

After years of sci-fi-inspired fantasies about the technique, a team of doctors in Pittsburgh are finally ready to start testing out a procedure that involves putting patients in a state of “suspended animation” while they repair their injuries. Put bluntly, they’re going to kill people and bring them back to life.


Someday, Surgeons Might Fix Your Broken Bones With Screws Made Of Silk

Surgeons have used metal screws to re-assemble broken bones for years, but there are drawbacks: if the metal corrodes, they have to come out. Biodegradable screws aren’t as strong and can cause inflammation. So a team of Harvard and Tufts scientists came up with screws and plates that are as tough as metal, but biodegradable. The trick? They’re made out of silk.


Surgeons Attach Man's Calf To His Arm To Save His Life

Ian McGregor lost his entire leg to a cancerous tumour, but he’s lucky to be alive thanks to a weird, never-before-attempted 18-hour surgical procedure: First doctors removed his calf and attached it to his arm to keep it alive during the tumour and leg amputation. Then they used the calf to fix the huge hole that resulted from the operation.


Cancer-Spotting Glasses Light Up The Bad Cells For Surgeons

Cancer surgery is tough. Even with high-powered microscopes, surgeons have a very difficult time distinguishing cancer cells from healthy cells. But these new glasses developed by Washington University, St Louis could change all that.


After 120 Years, Doctors Develop New Brain Surgery Technique

A team of surgeons from Johns Hopkins recently came up with a safer, better method of replacing skull fragments after brain surgery. This is good news for anybody who might need a little work done on their noggin in the near future, as doctors have been using the same method since the 1890s.


An 8K Endoscope Probably Shows More Than Anyone Really Wants To See

8K television broadcasts are slowly creeping towards becoming a reality, but 8K video technology is already being embraced and used in other industries. A group called the Medical Imaging Consortium — or MIC for short — has revealed that back in December they used a new 8K endoscope in an experimental surgery where they successfully removed a pig’s gall bladder.


British Doctor Branded His Initials On Patient's Liver

Artists generally like to sign their work. Painters, sculptors, poets, all leave their name as a mark of pride. But when your brush is a scalpel and your canvas is the human body, it’s probably best to avoid that urge. One British surgeon is finding that out, after being suspended for branding his initials on a patient’s liver. These ain’t cattle, doc!


3D Printing Gives A Dog A Bone (For Invasive Surgery)

3D printing offers some phenomenal opportunities to advance medical care, and not just for humans. At Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine, doctors are using a MakerBot 3D printer to make delicate doggie surgery possible.