stuxnet

The Stuxnet Worm Had An Evil Secret Twin

It’s been over three years since the discovery of the Stuxnet worm, but new revelations continue to trickle out from the cybersecurity community. Actually, this latest one is more of a torrent than a trickle: Turns out Stuxnet had an evil secret twin.


Did A USB Stick Infect A Russian Nuclear Plant With Stuxnet?

There’s a common misconception that you need to be connected to the internet to get infected with malware. Well, that’s not true and, according to renowned cybersecurity expert Eugene Kaspersky, the folks at a nuclear power plant in Russia learned this the hard way.


Someone's Trying To Shut Down Power Plants With Malware

Earlier this year, a devastating virus dubbed Flame made its way through power plants in Iran, wreaking havoc on system software, and prompting the country to disconnect itself from the internet. Now comes word from Kaspersky Labs that there’s a copycat virus doing the same thing to “at least one organisation in the energy sector.”


US President Barack Obama Ordered Devastating Cyberattacks Against Iran

In June of 2010, a security firm in Belarus called VirusBlokAda reported the first known citing of what we know now as Stuxnet. It was, simply put, the most advanced malware of all time. Its target? Iran. Its origin? Unknown. Until now.


Meet 'Flame', The Massive Spy Malware Infiltrating Iranian Computers

A massive, highly sophisticated piece of malware has been found infecting systems in Iran and elsewhere. It’s believed to be part of a well-coordinated, ongoing, state-run cyberespionage operation.


There's A New Stuxnet-esque Duqu Trojan And Nobody Knows What It Does

A newly surfaced version of the Duqu trojan indicates that the authors of one of the most sophisticated computer worms in recent memory are aggressively trying to figure out how to attack their next target.


Whoever Wrote The Duqu Trojan's Framework Wrote It In An Unknown Programming Language

The Duqu Trojan is one nasty piece of code, rivaled in sophistication only by its relative, the Stuxnet Worm. A new analysis of the Trojan, however, has revealed just how advanced it really is.


Did The US Create The Conficker Virus To Wipe Out Iran's Nukes?

The Conficker worm was one of the more intriguing and potentially destructive pieces of malware in the past decade. Earlier reports have suggested that Stuxnet was created by the US and Israeli governments, and now Reuters has a source telling them Conficker was also used to negate Iran’s nuclear program.


Iran-Busting Cyber Bomb Looked Like An Alien Weapon

Despite no official confirmation by the Pentagon, it’s a very safe assumption that the US created the Stuxnet worm (with Israel’s help) to take Iran’s nuclear reactors offline. But when it was first discovered, it seemed too sophisticated for Earthlings.


Stuxnet Deconstructed Shows One Scary Virus

Ready to shake in your shoes? This video breaking down how Stuxnet works and where it could go next is flat out frightening. (And if this wasn’t a government program, I’ll eat a centrifuge.)