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The World's First Firmware Worm For Mac Is Here, And It Sounds Scary

“Oh don’t worry,” your uncle said when you were shopping for a new computer. “Macs are virtually virus-proof.” Your uncle was wrong.


Foxconn Played An Unwitting Role In The Hack On The Iran Nuclear Talks

The story of Israel using a sophisticated cyberweapon to spy on the United States and others attending nuclear talks is getting weirder. According to Kaspersky, the attackers not only used a Stuxnet-like weapon — they also used a stolen security certificate from Foxconn to sign the malware.


US Tried To Attack North Korea's Nukes With A Computer Virus And Failed

Sometimes being an intensely secretive regime trading in relentless obscurity has its perks: The US tried to secretly attack North Korea’s nuclear program with a computer virus, but failed because it couldn’t find the information necessary to infect the North Korean system with a virus.


A Cyberattack Caused Real-Life Chaos At A German Steel Mill

At this point, it’s obvious that cyberattacks can have devastating, far-reaching consequences. Look at the fallout from the Sony hack. But it’s still very rare for digital aggression campaigns to cause direct physical damage, which is why a recent cyberattack that screwed with a blast furnace at a German steel mill is so disturbing.


Report: Iran Has Been Hacking Major Infrastructure For Last Two Years

Last year, we discovered that Iranian hackers had breached Navy computer systems, which sent an understandable wave of panic through the administration. But it looks like that might’ve just been the tip of a much bigger, more sophisticated and more deadly iceberg.


The Stuxnet Worm Had An Evil Secret Twin

It’s been over three years since the discovery of the Stuxnet worm, but new revelations continue to trickle out from the cybersecurity community. Actually, this latest one is more of a torrent than a trickle: Turns out Stuxnet had an evil secret twin.


Did A USB Stick Infect A Russian Nuclear Plant With Stuxnet?

There’s a common misconception that you need to be connected to the internet to get infected with malware. Well, that’s not true and, according to renowned cybersecurity expert Eugene Kaspersky, the folks at a nuclear power plant in Russia learned this the hard way.


Someone's Trying To Shut Down Power Plants With Malware

Earlier this year, a devastating virus dubbed Flame made its way through power plants in Iran, wreaking havoc on system software, and prompting the country to disconnect itself from the internet. Now comes word from Kaspersky Labs that there’s a copycat virus doing the same thing to “at least one organisation in the energy sector.”


US President Barack Obama Ordered Devastating Cyberattacks Against Iran

In June of 2010, a security firm in Belarus called VirusBlokAda reported the first known citing of what we know now as Stuxnet. It was, simply put, the most advanced malware of all time. Its target? Iran. Its origin? Unknown. Until now.


Meet 'Flame', The Massive Spy Malware Infiltrating Iranian Computers

A massive, highly sophisticated piece of malware has been found infecting systems in Iran and elsewhere. It’s believed to be part of a well-coordinated, ongoing, state-run cyberespionage operation.


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