Science

Would You Live In A 3D Printed House?

The potential of additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, to change the way buildings are made is indisputable. It’s being touted as a solution to challenges in our cities ranging from the need for affordable housing to infrastructure modernisation. The process has been slow, but it may well be a key ingredient in the future of the building industries.


What It Takes To Build A Snake-Proof Suit

Soon enough, you’ll be able to watch a man attempt to become a 25-foot, giant green anaconda’s dinner — willingly. And to make sure our human snake snack makes it out alive, scientists spent months designing, testing, and building one incontrovertibly snake-proof suit. Air mask, chainmail, pig’s blood and all.


Could You Launch Someone Into The Sun With A Big Enough Cannon?

In the spirit of making problems go away, sometimes you want to just launch a particular person/problem into the sun. So — could you? And just how big would the canon need to be?


These Microneedles Would Be So Much Better Than Injections

Injections kinda suck for regular adults, but for babies — who need a lot of them! — they can be downright dangerous. But by using many more, much smaller needles, life could be made better for fragile babies and scaredy-cat adults alike.


How To Keep Mosquitoes Out Of Your Yard

I have had it with bloody mosquitoes at outdoor dinner parties. To prevent the little blood suckers from ruining the your summer, drastic measures are necessary. Here are some of the most effective (or, at least, most satisfying) methods for your upcoming insect genocide.


All The Best Images From NASA's Black Hole Friday

In a proud and noble tradition stretching back a whole two years, NASA did Black Hole Friday last week, rather than just flogging a few Apollo mini-figs for 25 per cent off. We got science, we got knowledge and of course, a bunch of jaw-dropping images of black holes. Here are the best.


Proceeds Of Crime: How Polymer Banknotes Were Invented

The Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) and CSIRO’s 20-year “bank project” resulted in the introduction of the polymer banknote — the first ever of its kind, and the most secure form of currency in the world.

The project commenced in 1968 and continued until 1988 with the release of the A$10 bicentennial commemorative banknote. But it’s the story behind this story – a personal note of forgeries, underworld figures and CSIRO – that is just as impressive.


Scientists Say These Mysterious Prawns May Hold Keys To Alien Life

According to exobiologists at NASA, these mysterious prawns and its symbiotic bacterium may hold clues “about what life could be like on other planetary bodies”. It’s life that may be similar — at the basic level — to what could be lurking in the oceans of Europa, deep under the icy crust of the Jupiter moon.


This Machine Turns Water And CO2 Into Petrol

Despite all the efforts to the contrary, it’s an uncomfortable truth that our world mostly still runs on oil, made from dead little creatures and pumped from under the ocean. So a machine that could generate oil, without the need for drills or rigs or pipelines, just by combining hydrogen and CO2, sounds quite attractive.


7 Of Mankind's Biggest Screw-Ups In Space

Space isn’t having a great few months — from the exploding mishaps of Orbital Science’s Antares rocket, to the terrible tragedy of Virgin Galactic’s test flight, and the yay-but-oh-shit rollercoaster that’s been the ESA’s comet landing, things aren’t going entirely to plan. This isn’t without precedent, though: if you shoot enough things into the sky on top of volatile rockets, some of them are going to let you down. Or blow up.