Tagged With scanners

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Let's find out, shall we? I took this fairly large round mirror and scanned it using my Canon flatbed. The result was... let's say, not very mirror-like at all. In fact, the glass area was almost black.

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Portable document scanners have existed for years, and you can even get models as small as a business card. The catch, however, is that you need to physically move the scanner across a document yourself, which often leads to mixed results. And that's why Doxie's new Flip is so wonderful; it's basically a tiny flatbed scanner (about the size of a tablet) that doesn't require you to move it at all.

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CT, or computed tomography, scans are to X-rays what 3D movies are to classic 2D flicks. But instead of being just some gimmick to lure patrons into a theatre, CT scans result in 3D models that let doctors study internal medical conditions in amazing detail. But why stop there? Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute have now built a monstrous CT scanner that can scan entire cars and even shipping containers.

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3D printing is more popular and accessible than ever, and printers are on course to get even cheaper soon. But printing is only one side of the equation; what about taking 3D pictures? There's a convenient, handheld gadget in the works that could do just that, and way cheaper than anything else has before.

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Our use of unmanned drones is well documented, and we know about missiles that trigger before they hit the ground. But some of Black Ops 2's more, shall we say, "imaginative" technologies are based in reality too - they'll just need a little pushing along before they get to the hyper-weaponised state they are in Treyarch's imagining of 2025.

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In an effort to streamline the process of scanning hundreds of millions of titles, Google Books engineer Dany Qumsiyeh has designed a $US1500 automated scanner from sheet metal, dissected electronics, and a household vacuum. It can chew through a 1000-page odyssey in about 90 minutes, and you're welcome to build your own since Qumsiyeh has made his Linear Book Scanner open source.

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Within the next year or two, the US Department of Homeland Security will instantly know everything about your body, clothes and luggage with a new laser-based molecular scanner fired from 50 metres away. From traces of drugs or gun powder on your clothes to what you had for breakfast to the adrenaline level in your body — agents will be able to get any information they want without even touching you.

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Imagine a lightweight, battery-powered scanner with on-board storage that can function without a computer. No, we're not talking about some far-fetched gizmo Q might throw in the trunk of Bond's Aston Martin. We're talking about Apparent's Doxie Go, a real-world device you can sink your teeth into for $US199. It only sounds like it belongs in a spy movie.

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I loathe self-service checkouts at supermarkets. Not because I want to hang around there for the fun of it, but simply because they're so incredibly inefficient, especially if you're dealing with items that never had barcodes, such as fruit and vegetables. A new scanner from Toshiba might fix my woes, as it omits barcodes and just works out what it is you're holding in front of it.