Tagged With rhapsody

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newVideoPlayer( {"type":"video","player":"http://www.youtube.com/v/C-wva60DptI&hl=en&fs=1&fmt=22","customParams": ,"width":500,"height":412,"ratio":0.824,"flashData":"","embedName":null,"objectId":null,"noEmbed":false,"source":"youtube"} );Rhapsody just released a little teaser video for the next version of its iPhone app (to be followed closely by its new Android app) that marks a major change for the service: You can now download songs instead of streaming.

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When we last checked in with Lala, the music service promised us access to our local collections from anywhere over the web. Using a unique combination of uploading and matching their collection to yours, you can sync your various libraries and listen to them any place where internet is available. Now they are back with some brand new features, including a vastly expanded catalog, an iPhone app and the unheard of 10-cent song.

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Yes, Yahoo! Music Store's shutting down their DRM servers, but Big Purple's said that it'll definitely still be taking care of its customers. According to a Yahoo spokesperson, anyone who bought DRM music from the store "will be compensated for whatever they paid." No word on timetables or what form the compensation will take, but possible options include cash back or an un-DRMed MP3 version of the same track.

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In a continuation of Yahoo Music's move to send their customers over to Rhapsody, YM's shutting down their DRM servers as of September 30. Unlike when MSN's Music servers shut down and then re-opened, it's very unlikely that Yahoo's will do the same, seeing as there's a process to convert your existing Yahoo Music tunes over to Rhapsody. You'll have to transfer the songs before the deadline, or else all you'll be hearing is the sound of yourself weeping over your lost tunes.

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Rhapsody, known for its subscription music service, just opened a DRM-free MP3 store. The MP3s are encoded in 256kpbs CBR, and run US$.99 per track and US$9.99 per album. Shoppers can preview 25 full-length tracks a month from the standard 5 million song catalog, which is extra sweet if you ask us. To kick things off, the first 100,000 sign-ups to the store until July 4th get one album for free, so give it a try and let us know how it stacks up against the big boys. AU: I haven't checked yet, but I'm almost certain that this will be US only. Feel free to let me know if we can access it down under.

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As if it hasn't been a rough enough patch for Yahoo, the company just announced that it would be ditching its iffy attempt at all-you-can-eat DRM music, Yahoo! Music Unlimited, and turn what subscribers it does have over to Rhapsody. This is good news for people who may have signed up for Yahoo before reading reviews; in our observations, Rhapsody is a much better service. The only thing that strikes fear in us, from the press release: "A simple process...will convert Yahoo! Music Unlimited subscribers' music libraries to Rhapsody." Uhhh, just don't call it ConvertsForSure, okay? Thanks. Press release after jump.

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Just got word that the Rhapsody music service has a new Facebook app called Music By Rhapsody. You get "access" to 4.5 million songs, and there's a preference engine that recommends songs for you and your visitors to play from the profile page. The price catch is, you get 25 free songs per month, after which you have to upgrade to a paid-for plan.

And the whole thing, still in beta, feels more promotional than servicy. Like many Facebook apps, the promise of doing things right there on the profile page is quickly dashed, and you're whisked away to another page after just a click or two. I don't blame Rhapsody, I just think the Facebook app format is—ahem—highly overrated. I could be wrong; go check it out and report back here.