research

How Can We Better Spend Australia's $9 Billion In Research Funding?

Australia allocates around A$9 billion a year of taxpayers’ money for research, but how do we know if that money is being spent wisely? With the Australian Government threatening to reduce the amount of money allocated to research, it is time for researchers to take a more serious look at how to improve the research funding system.


UV-Powered Blood Test Could Make Universal Cancer Detection Possible

Early detection is the best tool to fight cancer, but biopsies can be painful and inconclusive. New research shows a simple blood test can detect cancers by blasting white blood cells with UV and seeing how they respond. Painless, universal cancer detection could be a drop of blood away.


Watch This Bot With A Broken Leg Learn To Walk Straight Again

Humans are highly adaptable creatures, and we’ll do anything we can to prevent an injury from completely immobilising us. So if robots are supposed to eventually take over all of our duties, they need to learn how to quickly bounce back from damage as well — which is what this research with walking robots is hoping to achieve.


Wet Computing Could Put A Terabyte In A Tablespoon

We live in a world of physical computing. Solids and silicon store all our tweets, texts, and selfies, but what if the traditional ways of computing underwent a phase change?


Augmented Reality Climbing Walls Turn Mountaineering Into A Game

There are lots of reasons to tackle a climbing wall at your local gym: it’s great exercise, it can improve your hand-eye coordination, and it helps instill useful mountaineering skills should you ever find yourself trapped on a cliff. But researchers at Aalto University in Finland want to take them one step further through the use of Kinect sensors and projectors that turn climbing walls into interactive games.


Tiny Gold Nanomotors Spin 10 Times Faster Than A Race Car Engine

Nanomotors are an amazing feat of engineering: tiny gold rods less than a micrometer long, powered by ultrasonic waves to spin at crazy-fast speeds. How fast? Scientists just figured out a way to measure, and it’s astonishing: 150,000 RPM, 10 times faster than the fastest race car engine.


New Super Software Tracks Every Cell In An Organism As It Develops

Imagine if we could track every single cell in an organism as it develops. The sheer volume of information about how life forms and works would be invaluable for scientific research. The only problem is the startling amount to computational power it would take to crunch that much data. At least until now it was.


A Dome Packed With 480 Cameras Captures Detailed 3D Images In Motion

If you’ve ever watched behind-the-scenes footage of a film with extensive visual effects, you’ve probably seen actors wearing ping-pong ball covered motion capture suits bringing digital characters to life. But researchers at Carnegie Mellon have come up with a better way to capture 3D motion that can be implemented almost anywhere, even inside an entire stadium, without the need for those awkward suits.


Projectors Could Turn Your Tiny Apartment Into A Goggle-Less Oculus Rift

The Oculus Rift promises to makeStar Trek TNG’s holodeck a reality, but only in your head. You can’t spend every moment of your life with a goofy visor strapped to your face, and that’s why this alternate approach to the holodeck — using projectors to make a tiny non-descript room appear massive — seems far more plausible.


How A Cat Poop Parasite Could Help Scientists Beat Cancer

This week, a team of researchers at Dartmouth announced an exciting, if terribly disgusting, medical discovery. A single-celled parasite usually found in cats’ intestines — and later in their poop — shows unique promise as a cancer treatment. The researchers even think the parasite could enable them to create personalised cancer vaccines.