research

This Could Be The World's First Robotic Action Figure

As eerily predicted in 1998′s Small Soldiers, a Japanese robotics company called Speecys is developing what it claims to be the world’s first robotic action figure that can move and pose all by itself — no imagination required.


Autonomous Carts Make The Easiest Part Of Shopping Even Easier

The best part of grocery shopping isn’t finding some exotic new flavour of yoghurt or the free samples, it’s tooling around the store like a rally car driver with your shopping cart. So why have researchers developed an autonomous human-tracking cart that follows you around the store? Seems like time better spent making checkout lanes less terrible.


Researchers Figured Out How To Prevent That White Film On Chocolate

It doesn’t hinder how it tastes in any way, but that white film that often appears on the surface of chocolate after a while looks really unappealing. Known as fat bloom, it affects even the highest quality of chocolate, and most often chocolate-covered treats. But it’s only recently that Fraunhofer’s researchers were finally able to figure out why chocolate coatings were more prone to the effect.


You Can Now Be Identified By Your Shaky Camera Footage

You might want to think twice before illegally filming the next concert you go to — at least using a body-worn GoPro or Google Glass. Even if we don’t realise it, we all move in our own unique way. It’s like a fingerprint based on motion, and now researchers at Cornell University have developed an algorithm that can analyse footage and determine who’s wearing the camera.


Scientists Created A Room Temperature Superconductor With Lasers

Superconductors are supposed to change the world. The only problem is that all of the materials we’ve used to produce need to be kept at near absolute zero temperatures in order to be superconducting. (See above.) But now, thanks to high-powered lasers, scientists successfully made a piece of ceramic superconducting at room temperature.


Humans Have Been Able To Perceive Infrared Light This Whole Time 

The human eye is a more complex and mysterious thing than we thought. Recently, a group of scientists were puzzled by flashes of green light they saw from an infrared laser, whose light should have been far outside the visible spectrum. Like scientists do, they investigated. Human eyes do indeed perceive infrared light, they found, but not they same way they perceive ordinary colours. It’s weirder than that.


This Cheap Little Circuit Could Double Data Speed On Your Next Phone

Wireless technology is already amazing. It’s any data you could ever want through the air. But some exciting innovations are hiding on the horizon. This cheap little circuit that allows a wireless antenna to send and receive data at the same time is one of them. It stands to double the rate at which your phone transfers data.


NASA Finally Tests Its Shape-Shifting Aeroplane Wings

First revealed to the public earlier this year, NASA and the US Air Force Research Laboratory have finally begun testing what they hope will be a revolutionary new aeroplane wing design that replaces moving parts with shape-changing assemblies allowing wings to bend and twist to manoeuvre a craft through the air.


Behold The Most Accurate Simulation Of An F5 Tornado Ever

As awful as the movie Twister was, it helped bring to light the challenges of researching tornadoes. Namely, how do you get close enough to study something that’s powerful enough to kill you? One obvious solution is to simulate them, and thanks to recent advancements, a team of researchers was finally able to create a deadly F5 tornado in a computer and keep it alive for an hour and 40 minutes, providing countless insights as it tore its destructive (but simulated) path.


New Software Will Give Doctors A Panoramic View Inside Your Bladder

Images of long sandy beaches, breathtaking mountains, and even bustling cities come to mind when you think about an extra wide panoramic photo — not the inside of somebody’s bladder. But new software promises to give doctors a better view inside a patient’s plumbing by stitching countless images from an endoscope together, making it easier to spot problem areas during an exam.