research

This Cheap Little Circuit Could Double Data Speed On Your Next Phone

Wireless technology is already amazing. It’s any data you could ever want through the air. But some exciting innovations are hiding on the horizon. This cheap little circuit that allows a wireless antenna to send and receive data at the same time is one of them. It stands to double the rate at which your phone transfers data.


NASA Finally Tests Its Shape-Shifting Aeroplane Wings

First revealed to the public earlier this year, NASA and the US Air Force Research Laboratory have finally begun testing what they hope will be a revolutionary new aeroplane wing design that replaces moving parts with shape-changing assemblies allowing wings to bend and twist to manoeuvre a craft through the air.


Behold The Most Accurate Simulation Of An F5 Tornado Ever

As awful as the movie Twister was, it helped bring to light the challenges of researching tornadoes. Namely, how do you get close enough to study something that’s powerful enough to kill you? One obvious solution is to simulate them, and thanks to recent advancements, a team of researchers was finally able to create a deadly F5 tornado in a computer and keep it alive for an hour and 40 minutes, providing countless insights as it tore its destructive (but simulated) path.


New Software Will Give Doctors A Panoramic View Inside Your Bladder

Images of long sandy beaches, breathtaking mountains, and even bustling cities come to mind when you think about an extra wide panoramic photo — not the inside of somebody’s bladder. But new software promises to give doctors a better view inside a patient’s plumbing by stitching countless images from an endoscope together, making it easier to spot problem areas during an exam.


Google Flu Trends Resorts To Actual Data Because It Got It Wrong

Remember how excited everyone was about Google Flu Trends last year when it confirmed all of our deepest and darkest fears that we were doomed to a winter of misery? Apparently, using peoples’ neurotic self-diagnoses isn’t the most accurate way to track disease. So now, Google has decided to introduce a “new” flu-tracking engine. The new part? Reliable data.


New Laser Projector Makes 3D Images That Hang In Mid-Air

Maybe the solution to touchscreen displays that don’t get washed out in direct sunlight is to skip the screen altogether. Researchers at Aerial Burton are working to perfect a new kind of display technology that uses lasers to produce 3D pixelated images that appear to hang in mid-air and are still visible no matter how bright it is outside.


Scientists Can Detect Disease By Dripping Urine Down This Tiny Tube

A team of chemists at Brigham Young University have developed a remarkably simple and cheap lab-on-a-chip test that can accurately detect markers of serious conditions like kidney disease or even prostate cancer using nothing but a drop of urine the and the perpetual pull of gravity.


A Hacked Lamp Turns Multiple Mobile Devices Into A Single Giant Display

How many mobile devices do you carry with you on a daily basis? A couple of smartphones, and maybe a tablet? When you get to work, that makes for quite a few displays floating around, and researchers at MIT have come up with software that can let them all function as one giant touchscreen, no matter how they’re arranged on a desk.


This Tiny Pocket Drone Flies For Two Hours With A Thin Wire Tether

Living in a mostly wireless world is a fantastic experience: were it not for constant connectivity issues, competing wireless protocols, limited ranges, and terrible battery life. That last issue is of particular concern for tiny reconnaissance drones like this hexcopter from Cyphy that work best when remaining aloft for hours. So its creators decided to skip squeezing a tiny battery onboard, and instead keep it tethered with a long invisible wire.


This Tiny Implantable Chip Is Powered By Sound

We’ve all but figured out how to make robots and machines tiny enough to operate inside the human body. The tricky part is figuring out a way to power them that’s safe for the host. In lieu of bulky batteries or inconvenient wires, researchers at Stanford University have developed an implantable wireless chip that can be powered by the same ultrasound waves used to safely image a foetus in the womb.


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