research

GM Is Developing Smarter Headlights That Will Follow A Driver's Gaze

There are already cars on the road with intelligent headlights that can sweep left or right to improve visibility as a vehicle steers into a turn. But Opel/Vauxhall, a European subsidiary of GM, are developing next-generation headlight systems that can keep track of where a driver’s looking, and automatically re-direct the lights in that direction.


A Re-Introduced Bill In The US May Unlock Published Scientific Knowledge For All

Promising public access legislation FASTR (Fair Access to Science & Technology Research Act) has been re-introduced by a bipartisan coalition in Congress. Lawmakers now have an important opportunity to strengthen and expand rules that allow taxpayers to freely read articles resulting from research their tax dollars support. EFF continues to encourage legislators to pass this bill as an important step forward — though there are still some measures to improve.


Swallowing This Capsule Lets Doctors Keep Tabs On Gas In Your Gut

A build up of intestinal gases isn’t just an etiquette problem — it’s also linked to conditions like irritable bowl syndrome. So researchers have created a swallowable capsule packed with sensors that’s able to measure the concentration of gases inside a patient, and wirelessly relay that info back to a smartphone app.


Most Americans Aren't Protecting Themselves Against Surveillance

As we inch up on the two-year anniversary of the Snowden leaks, it’s important to think about how the Earth-shattering revelations about America’s intelligence-gathering have affected Americans. We’re all using Tor and DuckDuckGo and PGP and protecting ourselves against surveillance now, right? LOL, no.


Americans Fear A Biblical Apocalypse Far More Than Brits

Market research company YouGov wanted to know how people in the US and the UK expected the world to end. What they found revealed a profound difference between the two countries.


A (Mostly) Scientific Guide To Pot And The Munchies

Everybody knows it: Weed makes you hungry. Smoking a bowl sends you searching for snacks. Hitting a spliff leaves you craving all kinds of candy. Ripping a bong gives you the munchies. We don’t know why. Science is getting close though, especially after this week.


Google Researchers Are Ranking Web Pages By Facts Not Links

Internet searches may be based on algorithmic rigour — but that doesn’t necessarily guarantee the quality of a suggested page. Now, a team of Google researchers has developed a method that sorts results by factual content rather than how well linked a page is.


Tiny Robot Grippers Dissolve Away In Your Body Once Their Job Is Done

As robots get small enough to easily swim around inside the human body, they will soon be used to perform medical procedures all from within a patient. And researchers at Johns Hopkins University are making such an idea even more plausible with the development of tiny robotic grippers that will actually dissolve away inside a patient after a medical procedure is complete.


Electron Microscopes Can Reveal Filed-Off Serial Numbers

To make it difficult for law enforcement to trace stolen cars or weapons, thieves will usually grind off their metal vehicle identification numbers or serial numbers. And while techniques for trying to recover those numbers do exist, they’re not as accurate as a new method developed by researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology — or NIST — that uses a scanning electron microscope to detect imperfections in the metal’s crystalline structure.


Pinchable Headphone Cords That Control Your Music Are A Brilliant Idea

The limits of battery life means that dealing with cords and cables — instead of going completely wireless — is still our reality for at least a few more years. So researchers at MIT figure we should just start using them to our advantage as smart remotes and controllers, instead of just a means to transfer power and data.