research

Disney Made A 3D Printer That Creates Soft Objects Using Fabric

Your typical 3D printer works by layering melted plastic to eventually build up a solid 3D object, but what happens when you swap plastic for fabrics? Suddenly you’ve got a machine that can create objects that are soft, deformable and cuddly.


Software Could Automatically Put Your Holiday Photos In Perfect Order 

If you rely on just a single camera while travelling, it’s easy to organise your photos by time and date when you get home. But most of us use multiple cameras, smartphones and action cams to document our travels. So researchers at Disney and the University of Washington are working on software that can automatically put all of those shots into a perfectly ordered slideshow.


The World's First Self-Powered Video Camera Can Record Forever

It makes perfect sense. The sensors that capture images for a digital camera and the sensors that convert light into electricity for a solar cell rely on the same technology. So why not build a device with a sensor that does both, and create a self-powered video camera? Some Columbia University researchers did just that.


GM Is Developing Smarter Headlights That Will Follow A Driver's Gaze

There are already cars on the road with intelligent headlights that can sweep left or right to improve visibility as a vehicle steers into a turn. But Opel/Vauxhall, a European subsidiary of GM, are developing next-generation headlight systems that can keep track of where a driver’s looking, and automatically re-direct the lights in that direction.


A Re-Introduced Bill In The US May Unlock Published Scientific Knowledge For All

Promising public access legislation FASTR (Fair Access to Science & Technology Research Act) has been re-introduced by a bipartisan coalition in Congress. Lawmakers now have an important opportunity to strengthen and expand rules that allow taxpayers to freely read articles resulting from research their tax dollars support. EFF continues to encourage legislators to pass this bill as an important step forward — though there are still some measures to improve.


Swallowing This Capsule Lets Doctors Keep Tabs On Gas In Your Gut

A build up of intestinal gases isn’t just an etiquette problem — it’s also linked to conditions like irritable bowl syndrome. So researchers have created a swallowable capsule packed with sensors that’s able to measure the concentration of gases inside a patient, and wirelessly relay that info back to a smartphone app.


Most Americans Aren't Protecting Themselves Against Surveillance

As we inch up on the two-year anniversary of the Snowden leaks, it’s important to think about how the Earth-shattering revelations about America’s intelligence-gathering have affected Americans. We’re all using Tor and DuckDuckGo and PGP and protecting ourselves against surveillance now, right? LOL, no.


Americans Fear A Biblical Apocalypse Far More Than Brits

Market research company YouGov wanted to know how people in the US and the UK expected the world to end. What they found revealed a profound difference between the two countries.


A (Mostly) Scientific Guide To Pot And The Munchies

Everybody knows it: Weed makes you hungry. Smoking a bowl sends you searching for snacks. Hitting a spliff leaves you craving all kinds of candy. Ripping a bong gives you the munchies. We don’t know why. Science is getting close though, especially after this week.


Google Researchers Are Ranking Web Pages By Facts Not Links

Internet searches may be based on algorithmic rigour — but that doesn’t necessarily guarantee the quality of a suggested page. Now, a team of Google researchers has developed a method that sorts results by factual content rather than how well linked a page is.