Tagged With recycling

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Something like $3,050,000,000 worth of vibrators are sold every year — that's 60 million vibrators. After a lifetime of service, when they have given out their last little buzz, where do they go? Into landfill. And that's a problem the world's first biodegradable vibrator hopes to solve.

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PhD student Songpol Boonsawat has developed a waste disposal system that turns household plastic waste, contaminated plastic waste and targeted plastic waste into fuel. If implemented across homes and councils across Australia, it could result in an 80 per cent reduction of plastic waste in landfill.

Songpol says there is huge potential for some councils to convert plastics into as much as 73 million litres of oil each year.

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Instead of collecting dust in a drawer, your old smartphone could be used to assist on of the 288,000 Australians living with no hearing or sight use technology to reconnect with family, friends and the wider community.

Not-for-profit mobile phone recycling program MobileMuster is collecting unwanted smartphones during the month of September to be donated to Able Australia, where they will be used to educate people with deafblindness on how to use speech recognition and Braille readers.

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Haven't cleaned your desk in years? At this point you've probably accumulated enough crap to recycle it all into something useful, instead of just sweeping it all onto the floor. YouTube's MrGear has an easy-to-follow tutorial show you how to turn an old CD case, some soda cans, and various unwanted electronic bits into a working homebrew blower.

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Australia's management of electronic waste is poorly implemented, lags behind international best practice, and is based on outdated recycling targets.

Scientists at University of New South Wales (UNSW) have reviewed Australia's e-waste laws, comparing them to those of two international leaders in the field of e-waste recycling: Japan and Switzerland. They found Australia's approach is ineffective and requires greater compliance measures to prevent hazardous pollutants from ending up in landfill.

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When you think of the daily abuse that aeroplane seats have to endure, it's a minor miracle they aren't torn to shreds after just a week of air travel. The fabrics used for the upholstery must be just short of indestructible, so it makes sense to eventually recycle those materials into bags and packs that can easily survive your daily commute.

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Video: When the Fed constantly replaces old, tattered dollar bills with new, crispy cash, millions of notes get pulled out of circulation while new dollar bills get put in circulation. So what happens to all that old money? It gets shredded. But then what?

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Video: There's about 2kg of salvageable copper inside your typical photocopier (mostly in the power supply and the motor's copper windings). Copper that can be mixed with zinc to create brass. Brass that can be shaped out to make a trumpet. It's the circle of life!

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Companies like New Balance have been using recycled plastic from water bottles to make shoes for years now. But Adidas is taking that idea one step further. Teaming up with Parley for the Oceans, its new Adidas x Parley sneakers are also made from plastics recovered from the ocean.

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The number of old mobile phones cluttering up Australian homes has reached a whopping 25.5 million handsets, of which four million are broken and no longer even working.

Consumer smartphone saturation and hoarding behaviour in Aussies has created what e-waste experts are calling a 'critical mass' of mobile phone clutter, as they call for more education around recycling.

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From the shearing shed to catwalk, world stockpiles of waste wool are suddenly in fashion with South Australian scientists who have found a way to give them high value.

Flinders University researchers have developed clean technology to dissolve waste wool and unwanted woollen products to produce a high-value protein called keratin, which you may recognise from your hair products.

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Video: I'm totally getting hypnotized watching this machine spin around and around as it crushes aluminium can after aluminium can. The colours of the soft drink, the constant spin of the wheel, the methodical movement of the arm, it all makes for such a satisfying video to watch. I think people would absolutely recycle more if they had access to this machine for half an hour every week.