Tagged With recognition

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newVideoPlayer("vocaljoy_gawker.flv", 475, 376); I know this video shouldn't make me laugh because the Vocal Joystick—a software that allows you to control your computer mouse using eight vowel sounds and the "sounds k and ch simulate clicking and releasing the buttons"—is amazing for people with disabilities. But I can't help it, I just find it hilarious. Its developers at the University of Washington have now came up with a version that controls a robotic arm to further help people with serious mobility problems.

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Given that SatNav systems are one of the hottest items to steal these days, Medion's latest GoPal might go some way in redressing the balance. Its P4425 model boasts fingerprint recognition for extra security, meaning that not only will thieves be unable to use it, but might find it that little bit harder to find out where you live &mdash unless, of course, your car is parked in your driveway when they break into your motor and steal it.

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Sennheiser's latest Bluetooth headset, the VMX 100, has on-board technology that distinguishes the human voice from background noise in order to provide a clearer outgoing sound during conversations. We're unsure how well the headset will distinguish background noise when the background noise is actually human conversation, but at least it'll have five hours talk time and 100 hours standby. The thing looks absolutely gigantic with the Borg attachment fitting over the ear, but we suppose that's where the voice distinguishing technology lives.

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It sounds like a double-whammy of a bad idea: a free phone service that determines which ads to target to you by applying speech-recognition to all your conversations. To make things worse, the home page of ThePudding.com insults potential customers by saying it's "a breakthrough technology that makes your phone calls interesting." Hey, my phone calls are a thrill a minute.

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This A1Pro keyboard isn't that useful for us, who can type just fine with the standard QWERTY keys, but is incredibly useful for, say, Chinese people who want to write characters the way they're used to writing on paper (typing takes a lot longer to learn). The keyboard looks normal on the left, but instead of a numpad, it has a smallish glowing tablet. If we ever wanted to write in Chinese—which we haven't done in about 14 years—we'd pick up one of these for $25.48.

AU: Looks like it shuts out us sinister handed folks... -SB

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newVideoPlayer("SonySmile_gawker.flv", 475, 376); In addition to a Carl Zeiss 5X zoom lens, 3.5" wide/touchscreen LCD, Sony's Cybershot T200 features a smile sensor that will automagically snag shots when your family and friends are pretending to enjoy your company. In this demonstration, the potential gimmick seems to actually work. Though you'll notice that the sensors have a tough time detecting profiles.

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Appian, the company behind much of Britain's surveillance madness, has released a new camera that will no doubt be top of the shopping lists of Big Brothers throughout the world. The Stinger is able to recognize license plates from any country thanks to its choice of IR wavelengths: 810; 870; and 940 NM. Then, ensuring that There Is No Escape For The Wicked, it can compare them to ones on a "hot list" stored on its internal 20GB hard drive. If it finds a dodgy plate, it contacts the police via either Ethernet, Wi-Fi or GSM/GPRS. Full stats and pricing after the jump.

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Samsung today announced its new i85 camera too, which includes a personal media player to really make use of its big 3" touchscreen LCD. The camera itself is an 8 megapixel with a 5x optical zoom lens and face recognition technology which automatically focuses on any faces that are in shot. The i85 will retail at $349 and should be appearing at the end of August.

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Samsung has unveiled three new models in their NV range today; the NV8 8-megapixel, the NV15 10-megapixel and the NV20 12-megapixel. They all feature the company's Smart Touch system, which wouldn't be out of place in a fighter plane. Or judging by its sleek looks, in a TIE Interceptor. More details after the jump.

galleryPost('samsungNV', 4, 'Samsung NV Range');

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Things are shaping up for an eventual Korea vs. Japan robot wars in the next 20 to 30 years, and Korea is getting ready with a robot that keeps your home safe. Unlike previous robots, this one from KornTech (snicker, snicker) is named Rogun and has high-end face tracking software, which means it can both recognize and track your kids by turning its head to face you no matter where you move.

Also, Rogun will use that same facial recognition to detect if strangers visit, and will call you on your phone if you're out. If you've left your kids at home, it can monitor them, and will stream updates to you over the Internet as well. Plus, there's a 7-inch LCD monitor in its chest so kids can interact with it. If you want one, be prepared to shell out more than $100,000 for the privilege. – Jason Chen

Robot Keeps Home Safe in Korea