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Razer Blade Review: The Best Gaming Laptop Just Got Even Better

For years now, the Razer Blade the go-to laptop for gamers who want a little style mashed up with their function. The 2016 version is the best yet: It’s lighter, faster, and — critically — cheaper. Yup, Razer made its sharpest Blade yet.


Here Is Razer's New Blade Stealth Ultrabook

Meet Razer’s newest ultrabook — the Blade Stealth — with a new sleek form factor, the latest Intel Core i7 processor and QHD or 4K display panels.

Starting at $1,549 and with the highest-end version priced at $2,449, this is Razer’s attempt to replace your portable computer, your desktop computer and your gaming computer all in one swoop.


Razer Ripsaw Gaming Capture Card: Australian Review

There’s no shortage of competition in the capture card market these days, whether you’re looking to record footage on consoles or PC. And considering Razer already supplies peripherals for every other aspect of broadcasting — mice, mousepads, keyboards, headsets, microphones, even the Razer Blade laptop — it only makes sense for them to get into the capture card game, too.

Unfortunately, the Ripsaw costs a lot. And when you can get the same hardware and performance — almost literally, in fact — elsewhere for substantially less, it makes the Ripsaw a hard sell.


Razer BlackWidow X Chroma Review: This Psychedelic Mechanical Keyboard Made Me A Believer

I’m by no means a hardcore gamer — whatever that even means in the growing world of esports and Let’s Plays. I’m not travelling to competitive tournaments or staying up nights, bloodshot and caffeinated, playing the latest and greatest RPG or MMO. Yet I do log a considerable amount of Steam hours, and in my amateur pursuits of gaming glory, I’ve mostly stuck with keyboards included on gaming laptops (small New York apartments abhor gaming rigs). I’ve used plenty of mechanical keyboards before, but for my gaming needs, nothing ever felt substantially better than what was already attached to my laptop. But after two weeks of toying with Razer’s new Blackwidow X Chroma, I’m starting to rethink my position.


Razer's New Keyboard Combo Lets You Game From The Comfort Of Your Couch

Although the PC chair is the place to be for a tense Counter-Strike match, there’s no substitute for the comfort of a couch when it comes to a marathon gaming session. Anyone with a PC hooked up to their TV knows that while remote controls and Bluetooth controllers can do a pretty good job, there’s still no substitute for a proper keyboard and mouse. Razer’s new Turret combo packs a foldable keyboard and mouse into a dock, unfurling into a complete gaming platform that can rest on your lap.


This Keyboard-Mouse Combo Is Ideal For Lazy Couch Gamers Like Me

I love gaming, but I also hate sitting up straight in chairs when I don’t absolutely have to. You’d think a console would be the solution, but really, this dumb-looking keyboard-mouse combo from Razer is the missing link.


Razer Nabu Review: Smart Features Made Stupid 

“For gamers, by gamers” is the kind of motto that sells liquid-cooled spec-obsessed towers, headsets, rumbling lounge chairs, and ergonomic mice with more buttons than a double-breasted suit. Razer, however, has these words stamped into the back of its wearable Nabu, which it’d like to remind us is not a smartwatch, but a watch with smart features.


Razer's New BlackWidow X Keyboard Is $330

A minimalist version of the popular BlackWidow keyboard, Razer’s new BlackWidow X Chroma is smaller, sleeker and more straightforward. It’s also cheaper, says Razer, but it’ll still set you back $330 in Australia. Man, mechanical keyboards are expensive.


Razer Donating Proceeds Of Cancer-Themed Game To Cancer Charities

Gaming peripheral and software company Razer announced today it will be donating all proceeds from the sales of narrative videogame That Dragon, Cancer on its OUYA store Cortex, to charity.


Gaming Software Showdown: Logitech Gaming Vs. Razer Synapse

Logitech and Razer both have some pretty awesome gaming peripherals. Whether you’re playing games or getting real work done, they’re both great options. The software they use have some small, but important differences. Here’s how they stack up against each other.


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