Tagged With radios

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Waking up to a blaring horn sucks, which is why many people use ambient light alarm clocks that gradually get brighter to ease themselves into consciousness. Want to wake up to a calming light and the soothing voices of Morning Edition anchors? JBL's Horizon Bluetooth Clock has you covered.

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By the late 1930s the vast majority of American households had a radio. So how were radio manufacturers supposed to expand their market? By insisting that the ideal American home has a radio in every room. Sometimes that meant putting radios in the latest appliances — like right inside every American's favourite new gadget, the mechanical refrigerator.

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There is no internet connectivity or reception in the remote locations frequented by American Special Forces, so they bring their own. Using a new generation of squad-based radio technology known as wideband tactical communications networks, our secret forces can call, text or video conference from anywhere in the world.

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A group of mechanical engineers at Columbia University have produced the world's tiniest FM radio transmitter. At its heart is a micrometre-sized oscillator powered by one-atom-thick graphene. But more than serving as a lilliputian proof of concept for tiny broadcasting equipment, this could help revolutionise smartphones and other gadgets.

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Drivers stuck with just an FM radio in their rides can now access Harman's Aha streaming content through Griffin's iTrip Auto transmitter. The service, which includes over 30,000 stations covering everything from music, to news, to audiobooks, has typically only been available in new vehicles or aftermarket in-dash stereos.

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Geneva, maker of very pretty but expensive rectangles that pump out sweet sound, has a radio that costs 300 bucks. To be fair, the Geneva WorldRadio is a little more than just a radio, it has a Bluetooth receiver, touch controls, alarm cock and a headphone jack (along with its FM tuner).

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Zap-happy channel-surfers could soon control a lot more than the TV from their remotes. Michael Ossmann, co-founder of Great Scott Gadgets, is developing HackRF, a software-defined radio (SDR) that lets you switch between radio frequencies on the fly.

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Classic turntables may get all the glamour, but the shortwave radio deserves a place of prominence in the home of any audiophile. For a stylish way to surf the airwaves, try this stunning late-1950s Trans-World T-9, produced by Philco. Beautiful chrome knobs handle tuning, tone and band selection, and the package comes with a world map, logbook and 12 pages of schematics.

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The Joint Tactical Radio System was an amazing concept put forward by the US military. It was designed to futureproof the entire communications system used by all US defence organisations, which is why it required 15 years of work and the investment of $US6 billion dollars. Sadly, things didn't go to plan.