Tagged With publishing

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Hugo Gernsback had such a huge impact on the history of science fiction that one of the field's most prestigious awards is named after him. But after he founded Amazing Stories in the 1920s, the pioneering editor had a long slide into obscurity.

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Elizabeth Bear is one of those authors who seems like an incredible writing machine. She's put out a huge number of books in the past 10 years, winning a ton of acclaim along the way. But in a brave post on Charles Stross' blog, she talks about the cost of being that prolific.

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A decade ago, cutting-edge writers/publishers were crafting books that were physically works of art, in response to the rise of ebooks. Now, those same people are making apps. Miranda July, creator of the instant-messaging app Somebody, talks to Russell Quinn, co-creator (with Eli Horowitz) of The Pickle Index and The Silent History, about making apps that are deliberately difficult to use.

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Promising public access legislation FASTR (Fair Access to Science & Technology Research Act) has been re-introduced by a bipartisan coalition in Congress. Lawmakers now have an important opportunity to strengthen and expand rules that allow taxpayers to freely read articles resulting from research their tax dollars support. EFF continues to encourage legislators to pass this bill as an important step forward — though there are still some measures to improve.

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How neat is this? The folks at Faber & Faber, an independent publishing house in London since 1929, recently found a forgotten hand press in their archives. As it turns out, the half-century-old machine was used by the firm's most famous designer, Berthold Wolpe: they've since refurbished the relic, which is going to be back in action producing limited edition broadsides and paper goodness for a brand new imprint.

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Perhaps the future of newspapers is all about local distribution — very local distribution, as in a whole newspaper printed for just one coffeeshop in London. The Newspaper Club has teamed up with The Guardian to launch what they call an "algorithmic newspaper", published only for one location, its content mathematically harvested according to level of interest from the Guardian's weekly coverage. How does that work, exactly?

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Internet juggernaut Amazon and print media juggernaut Conde Nast are debuting one-click print and web subscriptions to some of Conde Nast's most popular magazines today. Buy a print subscription through Amazon All Access, and you'll get immediate access to the web version, with six-month print plus digital trial subscriptions starting at three bucks.