Tagged With privacy

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With modern cars becoming more connected, with smarter features, hacking is a real danger. It's rare, but it's already happening. We're not in the "stop your engine" world yet, but it's easy to break into a car with keyless entry and steal everything inside without the owner ever knowing the car was unlocked.

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If you're erasing sensitive files from a computer, you probably want them gone forever and far beyond the reach of data recovery tools. Unfortunately, that's not what happens all of the time. Here are some simple steps you can take to make sure your files are deleted permanently.

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The second you log onto the internet, you start leaving a trace that's more telling than you think. Browsers can not only identify where you are in the world, but they collect a ton of other data too, such as where your mouse is hovering and when you launch a private browser window. Here's a way to find out exactly what you're leaking.

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This weekend, San Francisco's Municipal Railway was savaged by hackers demanding over $US70,000 ($93,679) in bitcoins, leaving the metro system unable to collect fares. But the hack may be much more devastating for the transit agency, according to a list of servers allegedly compromised by the hackers and obtained by Gizmodo.

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Without the aid of specialised tools, everything you do online (and plenty of things you don't realised you're doing) is being tracked. Desktop browsers have the benefit of extensions and add-ons that block pages from tracking you, but mobile browsers tend to be a little less advanced. That's what makes Focus, Firefox's privacy-forward iOS browser, so refreshing.

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Yesterday, against all odds, Donald J. Trump was elected president of the United States. The real estate mogul and reality TV star, who has said he would ban all Muslims from entering the country and once bragged about sexually assaulting women, will now take the reins of the country at a precarious time.

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Google provides a lot of helpful, free services, but they often come at the cost of privacy. You might love Gmail, but you have to suffer through targeted ads; you may enjoy using Google Maps, but you have to give up your location privacy. Signing up for Google's suite of apps almost always involves some degree of data collection, but you should at least try to limit the amount of spying the company performs on you. Here's how you can keep using Google's apps without constantly getting spied on.

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Look to your left. Look to your right. Do you see two people? Congrats on being social today. One of those two people is probably included in the FBI's massive facial recognition database. A new Georgetown report says there are 117 million Americans in the database. That's about 50 per cent of the US population.

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Now that everyone with a few hundred bucks to burn can become an amateur drone pilot, we're seeing quadcopters buzzing all over the place, including places they're not supposed to fly. That's where the drone-hunting Airspace comes in. Like a bird of prey, it hunts down other flying drones and knocks them out of the air.

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Tinder, with its data-driven approach to romance, has always had a slightly creepy feel — it's basically just a game to win, after all. But now, with a new feature called Smart Photos, the app has gone one step further in turning its users into human guinea pigs whose every swipe is catalogued and carefully tracked.

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Kim Kardashian was "bound and gagged" in a Paris hotel on Sunday evening while being held up at gunpoint by five armed men dressed as policemen. While the hotel itself is known for its discretion when hosting celebrities, one has to wonder exactly how the thieves tracked down Kardashian's exact location. The Kardashians have publicly expressed anxiety that Snapchat could be revealing their locations in the past.