privacy

FBI Turned Off Hotel Internet, Impersonated Cable Guy To Catch Gamblers

It is not a good week for FBI undercover sting operations. After yesterday’s revelation that the FBI planted a phoney, malware-loaded Seattle Times article, we’re now getting wind of another FBI scheme in which agents impersonated internet repairmen. As if we needed another reason not to trust the cable guy.


Tim Cook Talks Privacy, Watch Batteries And The Future Of TV

In a rare public interview, Tim Cooks spoke to the Wall Street Journal’s Gerard Baker at the newspaper’s 2014 global technology conference last night. Here are a few choice cuts.


FBI Planted Phishing Scam On Fake Seattle Times Page To Trap Teen

For years, phishing scammers have been setting up fake tech support hotlines, websites to plant malicious malware on unsuspecting machines. And, apparently, even the FBI has been getting in on the fun. Because, back in 2007, the FBI created a fake Seattle Times web page, all to catch a high school bomb threat suspect.


US Government Authority Intended To Work On Terrorism Does Everyday Spying

The Patriot Act continues to wreak its havoc on civil liberties. Section 213 was included in the Patriot Act over the protests of privacy advocates and granted law enforcement the power to conduct a search while delaying notice to the suspect of the search. Known as a “sneak and peek” warrant, law enforcement was adamant Section 213 was needed to protect against terrorism. But the latest government report detailing the numbers of “sneak and peek” warrants reveals that out of a total of over 11,000 sneak and peek requests, only 51 were used for terrorism. Yet again, terrorism concerns appear to be trampling our civil liberties.


Why The FBI Director Is Wrong About Encryption

FBI Director James Comey gave a speech reiterating the FBI’s nearly 20-year-old talking points about why it wants to reduce the security in your devices rather than help you increase it. Here’s the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s response.


What Do Self-Driving Cars Mean For Personal Privacy And Data Security?

Autonomous vehicles, or self-driving cars, are likely to be seen more widely on roads in 2015. Already, legislation authorising the use of autonomous vehicles has been introduced in the US states of Nevada, Florida, California and Michigan, with similar legislation being planned for the UK.

To date, these laws have focused on legalising the use of autonomous vehicles and dealing, to an extent, with some of the complex issues relating to liability for accidents. But as with other emerging disruptive technologies, such as drones and wearables, it is essential that issues relating to user privacy and data security are properly addressed prior to the technologies being generally deployed.


5 Ways To Hide From Common Surveillance Tech

We may not be in a total surveillance state yet, but thanks to the FBI’s insane new facial recognition system, a 1984-esque reality doesn’t seem quite so far away. Fortunately, scientists and designers alike are hard at work building counter surveillance solutions to ease (and hide) our worried minds.


Facebook: The DEA Can't Use Fake Profiles To Chase Suspects

Remember how the US Justice Department decided it was just fine for a Drug Enforcement Administration agent to steal a woman’s identity and set up a fake Facebook account to chase subjects? Well, Facebook’s not OK with that.


iOS Expert: Don't Use Whisper If You Want To Remain Anonymous

When apps are accused of shady behaviour, Jonathan Zdziarski is the guy that investigates. And, this week, the self-identified iOS forensics expert was quick to respond to requests for a deep dive into Whisper, the supposedly anonymous secret-sharing app that’s been taking heat lately. Guess what: Whisper’s not so anonymous.


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