Loading page

Hard Labour: The Case For Testing Drugs On Pregnant Women

Traditionally, expectant mothers have been excluded from clinical trials, but could this practice be doing more harm than good?

When the heart stops beating, minutes matter. With every minute that passes before a rhythm is restored, a patient’s odds of survival plummet. Which is why Anne Lyerly was surprised when, one night 20 years ago, she got a phone call from a doctor who had paused in the middle of treating a patient in cardiac arrest. Lyerly was a newly minted obstetrician; the caller was an internal medicine resident who was desperately trying to resuscitate a dying patient. A pregnant dying patient. He had called because his supervisor wanted to know whether a critical cardiac drug would be safe for the woman’s foetus.

Menstruation: The Aftermath Of An All-Natural But Ruthless Embryo Screening

Video: Most animals don’t menstruate. If they don’t use their uterine lining, they simply reabsorb it. Only bats, monkeys, and apes take the drastic and seemingly-wasteful step of pitching out the entire thing. And humans toss it out more often than any other animal.

Want To Get Pregnant? Have Sex All Month Long, Not Just Near Ovulation

Heterosexual couples trying to start a family have tools to tell them when it’s time for baby-making sex: apps can track a woman’s cycle; over-the-counter tests can pinpoint ovulation. But it turns out the sex they’re having the rest of the month could be just as important for starting that bundle of joy.

A Man Who Makes Babies -- Lots -- But Lives Alone

People who want to start a family but have, for whatever reason, a problem with the sperm – half of the equation – have options. There are in-vitro methods that get sperm right next to or injected directly inside an egg. There are sperm banks. Some people have friends who are willing to be sperm donors. And the internet has created a murky world of “natural inseminators” — men who will start a pregnancy for strangers with sex, no strings attached.

Seahorse Dads Do Much More Than Just Shelter Their Babies While Pregnant

A male seahorse gets pregnant when his mate deposits her as-yet-unfertilized eggs into a pouch on his belly. He’ll fertilize them once they’re in there, and then he’ll carry the developing embryos until they’re ready to feed themselves. (At which point he forcefully shoots them into the world.)

This Fetal Monitoring System Is The Best Thing Apple Has Ever Done For Women

Of the many new experiences you might have during a high-risk pregnancy, one of the least fun is a fetal monitoring test called a Non-Stress Test, or NST. It really should be called a High-Stress Test because of the anguish it puts parents through. Apple just made it a little bit better.

Here's What Sex Education Was Like In The 17th Century

People have always wondered about sex, and as literacy became more widespread over the course of the 17th century in England, books appeared to feed that curiosity.

Bodypaint Shows How A Baby Fits Inside A Pregnant Woman's Body

Photographer Leonie Versantvoort created this Bellypaint photo with body painter Marieke van den Dungen-Crone that cleverly and beautifully shows how a baby looks inside a pregnant mother’s body. It’s obviously not super scientific but it’s really cool to see how a woman’s body adapts it body to become a home for them little humans.

Meanwhile In The Future: A World With Artificial Wombs

Well hello there, and welcome to our very first episode of a brand new podcast called Meanwhile in the Future! I’m Rose, and I’ll be your host for this set of forays into the future.

I Almost Replaced My Birth Control With An App

I don’t need to tell you there’s no great birth control option right now. Hormonal contraceptives are like a carnival ride for your mood, IUDs are physical sperm-gates that need to be surgically shoved up your vaginal canal, and show me someone who tells you condoms feel good and I will show you a liar. That’s why the promise of hormone-free, noninvasive birth control with a smartphone app, crazy as it sounds, is so alluring. A Swedish app called NaturalCycles almost made me a believer.

Loading page