oceanography
Loading page

We Know Exactly Where All The Heat From The 'Global Warming Hiatus' Went

You might remember hearing about the global warming “hiatus” a few years back — a pause in Earth’s inexorably rising temperature, which some used as evidence that climate change is a hoax. But scientists are now completely sure that the pause never happened. And we know exactly where the missing heat wound up.


Meet NASA's Newest Ocean-Exploring Satellite

SpaceX launched the planet’s newest oceanographic satellite this morning. Here’s the scoop on Jason-3, and how “sea level” is one of those little white lies you learned in school.


New XPrize Encourages Robotic Ocean Exploration

We know surprisingly little about our oceans. To help with this glaring blind spot, the XPrize has announced a new $US7 million contest to foster innovations in ocean exploration technology.


This Is How The Ocean Makes Earth Livable

Seventy per cent of Earth’s surface is ocean, and without it, the other 30 per cent would barely be inhabitable. The ocean absorbs and distributes heat around the globe, and it acts as a planet-sized CO2 scrubber, saving us all from a runaway greenhouse effect like the one that turned Venus into a hell-world. But the ocean, like the rest of Earth’s climate system, is changing — and not for the better.


After The Supermoon, Came The Supertide

Many locations along the UK, US and Australian coasts will experience their highest tides for tens of years around September 29 or 30. Coastal roads in Miami, for instance, have already been closed in anticipation of exceptional tides.


The Global Warming 'Pause' Never Actually Happened

There’s been much debate these past few years over the cause of the so-called global warming “hiatus” — a pause in the overall uptick up of Earth’s temperature due to cooling at the surface of the Pacific Ocean since the early 2000s. Did climate warming stop? Nope, we just weren’t looking deep enough.


Monster Machines: This Super-Tough Vent Camera Keeps Tabs On Undersea Aliens

One of the hottest areas of oceanic research centres around deep sea hydrothermal vents and the unique animal species that call it home. But at depths of more than a mile, donning a snorkelling mask and flippers just won’t cut it. That’s why Ocean Networks Canada has deployed a state-of-the-art camera to document life in the Grotto Hydrothermal Vent in real time.


Monster Machines: Alvin Gets Back To Work After $42 Million Retrofit

Barely a week since successfully completing sea trials after a three year hiatus, the venerable research sub Alvin is already earning back the $US42 million in hardware upgrades and engineering retrofits it’s received — showing off its spacious new three-crew cabin with a quick dive to the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico. But this is no pleasure cruise.


A Fleet Of Unpowered Submarines Is About To Plumb The Ocean's Depths

Even though they cover two-third’s of the planet’s surface, we know precious little about how the oceans actually interact with the continents and atmosphere. What’s more, our oceanic models are woefully incomplete — only capable of showing large areas with reduced resolution or in high detail over a limited area. But a new fleet of autonomous research submarines are about to rectify that problem.


Monster Machines: This Torpedo Keeps Social Tabs On Sharks

Sand Tiger sharks have been patrolling coastal waters worldwide for more than 250,000 years. But with only a pair of pups born every few years, this placid apex predator is succumbing to human pressures.


Loading page